UN secretary-general wants global regulations to combat cyberwars

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UN Secretary-General António Guterres on Monday called for the creation of a regulatory body charged with fighting electronic warfare campaigns that target civilians

While speaking at his alma mater, the University of Lisbon, the UN chief said a global set of rules that would help protect civilians from disinformation campaigns – many of which have revolutionized the way interested parties weaponise information through the use of the internet and social media networks.

State-sponsored computer hackers, including “Fancy Bear” and “Cozy Bear” – both controlled by Russia’s intelligence services, have disrupted multinational firms and public services, as well as political campaigns, and most recently the opening ceremonies of the ongoing Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games.

“Episodes of cyber warfare between states already exist. What is worse is that there is no regulatory scheme for that type of warfare. It is not clear how the Geneva Convention or international humanitarian law applies in these cases,” Guterres said while speaking at the University of Lisbon. “I am absolutely convinced that unlike the great battles of the past, which opened with a barrage of artillery or aerial bombardment, the next major war will begin with a massive cyber attack to destroy military capacity and to paralyse basic infrastructure, including electric networks.”

Cyber-warfare has moved to the forefront of military planning over the last decade. Russia’s GRU military intelligence unit successfully tested its ability to disrupt public services in Estonia and Georgia more than a decade ago, Western military planners have scrambled to counter the advances that Moscow has made in developing advanced cyber-warfare strategies.

NATO is in the process of cyberwar principles that will act as a strategic framework for guiding the alliance’s force reaction in the event of a crippling cyber attack to its command structure or the deployment of cyberweapons against one of the alliance allies. NATO command hopes to have a broad plan in place by 2019, but questions remain as the US administration under Donald Trump had continued with its lukewarm embrace of the 68-year-old North Atlantic Alliance.

During his speech in Lisbon, Gutteres offered to use the UN as a platform for scientists, programmers, and government representatives to develop rules that would help minimise the amount of access certain agents of war would have when trying to make contact with unwitting civilians.

Guterres said he believed it possible for leading computer specialists and like-minded lawmakers to created a set of rules that would “guarantee the more humane character” of a conflict involving information technology and help preserve cyberspace as “an instrument in the service of good”, but warned that time was not on their side as technological advances far outpace the traditional methods of working out universally accepted rules that include the Geneva Conventions of 1864-1949.

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Future war: the UN Secretary General called for the fight against cyber warfare

#technology #HiTech #devices #news #World #Europe


Cyber war between States” the world is watching today.

UN Secretary-General, antónio Guterres, called for the unification of the world community to minimize the impact of cyber warfare on civilian lives.

This writes with reference to .

“The next war will begin with a massive cyber attack aimed at destroying the military potential and paralysis of basic infrastructure such as electric networks,” – said Guterres during a speech at Lisbon University on February 19.

Guterres proposed the creation of a UN platform on which scientists, officials and others could develop rules “to ensure more humane” solution to any conflict associated with information technology.Guterres made the statement after the United States and Britain last week accused Russia of a virus NotPetya in June 2017, which violated the companies ‘ activities throughout Europe, primarily in Ukraine. Moscow has rejected the accusations, calling them unfounded.

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Report: US ‘Laying the Groundwork’ for Cyber Attacks Against North Korea

A Foreign Policy report suggests the United States is currently “laying the groundwork” for cyber warfare against North Korea as an alternative method of neutralizing the rogue communist regime.

Foreign Policy magazine’s Jenna McLaughlin spoke to six U.S. intelligence officers who revealed that, while the military prepares for a potential conflict with North Korea, authorities are also developing digital infrastructure designed to target Pyongyang.

“The U.S. government for the past six months has covertly begun laying the groundwork for possible cyber attacks on North Korea in countries including South Korea and Japan,” the magazine wrote.

“This process involves installing fiber cables as bridges into the region and setting up remote bases and listening posts, where hackers may attempt to gain access to a North Korean Internet that’s largely walled off from external connections,” it continued.

The article also detailed how national security officials are reportedly switching the focus from current intelligent operations towards the North Korean threat, which has significantly escalated over the past year amid repeated threats of nuclear war.

Some of this investment reportedly includes developing “signals intelligence, overhead imagery, geospatial intelligence, and other technical capabilities,” while intelligence officials serving in less threatening parts of the world will be relocated.

“The national technical focus is being switched,” the article quotes one intelligence official as saying. “If you’re an Africa analyst, you’re f*****.”

Experts suggest that the U.S. could initiate a cyber war by targeting North Korea’s cryptocurrency reserves, following reports that they successfully hacked exchanges from South Korea last month in a bid to access hard currency.

North Korea itself is believed to have been responsible for multiple cyber attacks. Last May, cybersecurity experts provided evidence that North Korea was behind a global “ransomware” attack that took hostage computers and servers around the world.

In 2014, the regime was also accused of conducting a cyber attack on Sony Entertainment after the release of the action comedy film The Interview which told the story of two journalists sent to North Korea to assassinate dictator Kim Jong-un.

President Donald Trump’s homeland security advisor Thomas Bossert recently told reporters that there is not “a lot of room left here to apply pressure” against the regime as it inches closer to completing its nuclear arsenal.

“The Administration has made North Korea a top priority, and the CIA established its Korea Mission Center to harness the full resources, capabilities, and authorities of the Agency to address the threat posed by Kim Jong Un and his regime,” CIA spokesman Jonathan Liu told the magazine. “We shift resources as appropriate to tackle our most pressing challenges.”

Follow Ben Kew on Facebook, on Twitter at @ben_kew, or email him at bkew@breitbart.com.

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UN chief urges global rules over cyber warfare

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres called for global rules to minimize the impact of electronic warfare on civilians as massive cyber-attacks look likely to become the first salvoes in future wars, Reuters reports.

“Episodes of cyber warfare between states already exist. What is worse is that there is no regulatory scheme for that type of warfare, it is not clear how the Geneva Convention or international humanitarian law applies to it,” Guterres was quoted said in a speech in Lisbon on Monday.

“I am absolutely convinced that, differently from the great battles of the past, which opened with a barrage of artillery or aerial bombardment, the next war will begin with a massive cyber-attack to destroy military capacity… and paralyze basic infrastructure such as the electric networks,” he said.

Speaking at the University of Lisbon after receiving an honorary degree, Guterres offered the UN as a platform where various players from scientists to governments can meet and work out such rules “to guarantee a more humane character” of any conflict involving IT, the report said.

Rules must be designed to ensure that the Internet remains “an instrument in the service of good”, the UN chief said.

Addressing professors and engineers at his alma mater, Guterres urged them to contribute to the process, which had to run much faster than before.

Traditional ways of working out such rules could take decades – too slow for the rapidly changing technology scene, he said.

The comments came after computer hackers, many of them believed to be state-sponsored groups, last year disrupted multinational firms, ports and public services on an unprecedented scale around the world, Reuters noted.

A group of NATO allies said last year they were drawing up cyber warfare principles to guide their militaries on what justifies deploying cybe- attack weapons more broadly, aiming for agreement by early 2019.

Some NATO allies believe shutting down an enemy power plant through a cyber-attack could be more effective than air strikes.

– Contact us at [email protected]

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UN chief urges global rules over cyber warfare

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres called for global rules to minimize the impact of electronic warfare on civilians as massive cyber-attacks look likely to become the first salvoes in future wars, Reuters reports.

“Episodes of cyber warfare between states already exist. What is worse is that there is no regulatory scheme for that type of warfare, it is not clear how the Geneva Convention or international humanitarian law applies to it,” Guterres was quoted said in a speech in Lisbon on Monday.

“I am absolutely convinced that, differently from the great battles of the past, which opened with a barrage of artillery or aerial bombardment, the next war will begin with a massive cyber-attack to destroy military capacity… and paralyze basic infrastructure such as the electric networks,” he said.

Speaking at the University of Lisbon after receiving an honorary degree, Guterres offered the UN as a platform where various players from scientists to governments can meet and work out such rules “to guarantee a more humane character” of any conflict involving IT, the report said.

Rules must be designed to ensure that the Internet remains “an instrument in the service of good”, the UN chief said.

Addressing professors and engineers at his alma mater, Guterres urged them to contribute to the process, which had to run much faster than before.

Traditional ways of working out such rules could take decades – too slow for the rapidly changing technology scene, he said.

The comments came after computer hackers, many of them believed to be state-sponsored groups, last year disrupted multinational firms, ports and public services on an unprecedented scale around the world, Reuters noted.

A group of NATO allies said last year they were drawing up cyber warfare principles to guide their militaries on what justifies deploying cybe- attack weapons more broadly, aiming for agreement by early 2019.

Some NATO allies believe shutting down an enemy power plant through a cyber-attack could be more effective than air strikes.

– Contact us at [email protected]

CG/RC

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Australia blames Russia for cyber attack

The Australian government has placed the blame on Russia for last year’s NotPetya cyber attack on critical infrastructure and businesses, which caused billions of dollars of damage.

The NotPetya ransomware was first seen in the Ukraine in June last year but quickly spread around the world, hitting state and private sector companies and destroying data.

Late last week, Australia followed in the footsteps of the UK and US in attributing the cyber attack to Russian state actors.

In a statement, Minister for Law Enforcement and Cyber Security Angus Taylor slammed Russia over the attack.

“Based on advice from Australian intelligence agencies, and through consultation with the United States and United Kingdom, the Australian government has judged that Russian state sponsored actors were responsible for the incident,” Taylor said in the statement.

“The Australian government condemns Russia’s behaviour, which posed grave risks to the global economy, to government operations and services, to business activity and the safety and welfare of individuals.”

The statement came just hours after the UK government also placed the blame squarely on Moscow.

“The decision to publicly attribute this incident underlines the fact that the UK and its allies will not tolerate malicious cyber activity,” the British ministry said in a statement.

“The attack masqueraded as a criminal enterprise but its purpose was principally to disrupt. Primary targets were Ukrainian financial, energy and government sectors. Its indiscriminate design caused it to spread further, affecting other European and Russian business.”

On the same day, the US government also confirmed it believes the Kremlin was behind NotPetya.

“In June 2017, the Russian military launched the most destructive and costly cyber attack in history,” the White House said.

“The attacked quickly spread worldwide, causing billions of dollars in damage across Europe, Asia and the Americas.

“It was part of the Kremlin’s ongoing effort to destablise Ukraine and demonstrates ever more clearly Russia’s involvement in the ongoing conflict. This was also a reckless and indiscriminate cyber-attack that will be met with international consequences.”

UK defence secretary Gavin Williamson said the state-sponsored attack signalled that the West had “entered a new era of warfare”.

British foreign ministry junior minister Tariq Ahmad also slammed Russia over the incident.

“The Kremlin has positioned Russia in direct opposition to the West: it doesn’t have to be that way,” Ahmad said.

“We call upon Russia to be the responsible member of the international community it claims to be rather than secretly trying to undermine it.”

The Russian government has continually denied that it was behind the attack, and Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov said it “categorically denies the allegations”.

“We consider [them] groundless,” Peskov said.

“This is nothing more than a continuation of a Russophobic campaign that is without proof.”

It was reported in January that the CIA had already attributed the NotPetya attack to Russian military hackers.

Taylor said the Australian government is working to protect itself and its allies from further cyber attacks.

“The Australian government is further strengthening its international partnerships through an International Cyber Engagement Strategy to deter and respond to the malevolent use of cyberspace.

“The government is committed to ensuring the Australian public sector, businesses and the community are prepared for evolving cyber threats.”

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