Kratos Receives $3.5 Million Critical Infrastructure Security Contract Award



SAN DIEGO, July 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ:KTOS), a leading National Security Solutions provider, announced today that its Public Safety & Security Division (PSS) has recently received a $3.5 million critical infrastructure security contract award. Under the new contract award, Kratos will design, engineer and deploy an integrated security system for a large mass transit authority in the United States. Kratos is an industry leader in the design, engineering, deployment, integration and operation of security systems for public safety and critical infrastructure in the United States.

Ben Goodwin, President of Kratos’ Public Safety & Security Division, said, “PSS is an industry leader in sophisticated security system applications for some of the largest mass transit authorities in the country, and we are proud to have been selected by this extremely important customer.”

About Kratos Defense & Security Solutions

Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ:KTOS) develops transformative, affordable technology for the Department of Defense and commercial customers. Kratos is changing the way breakthrough technology for these industries is brought to market through proactive research and a streamlined development process. Kratos specializes in unmanned systems, satellite communications, cyber security/warfare, microwave electronics, missile defense, training and combat systems. For more information go to www.kratosdefense.com.

Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements in this press release may constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are made on the basis of the current beliefs, expectations and assumptions of the management of Kratos and are subject to significant risks and uncertainty. Investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. All such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and Kratos undertakes no obligation to update or revise these statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Although Kratos believes that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, these statements involve many risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from what may be expressed or implied in these forward-looking statements. For a further discussion of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those expressed in these forward-looking statements, as well as risks relating to the business of Kratos in general, see the risk disclosures in the Annual Report on Form 10-K of Kratos for the year ended December 25, 2016, and in subsequent reports on Forms 10-Q and 8-K and other filings made with the SEC by Kratos.

Press Contact:Yolanda White858-812-7302 Direct Investor Information:877-934-4687investor@kratosdefense.com

Source: Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc.

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July 25, 2017

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Cyber warfare adding extra complexities

Evolving technological capabilities are adding a complex cyber warfare component to defence operations like the joint US and Australian training exercise off Queensland, a top American admiral says.

The comments from the commander of the United States Pacific Fleet, Admiral Scott Swift, came as Operation Talisman Sabre wound up on Tuesday.

More than 30,000 personnel from both nations took part in the three-week long, mid-intensity training exercise.

Air, land and maritime training exercises were undertaken as part of the biennial engagement off the Queensland coast, but added to the operation for the first time was cyber warfare.

Talisman Sabre’s purpose was to ensure the two allies were interoperable as well as strengthening their response capacity.

Admiral Swift said the addition of cyber warfare activities had set the operation apart from previous war games.

“I look at it as the most complex Talisman Sabre we’ve ever done, and we also discussed this morning that we have to keep pushing that complexity because the problems in the world are not getting easier,” he said aboard the flagship American aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan in Brisbane.

“I wish they were getting easier but they’re not.”

The 333 metre long, nuclear-powered carrier docked at the Port of Brisbane on Sunday, giving its crew of thousands a chance to explore the Queensland capital.

Australian and US forces take part in the exercise every two years, with this year’s engagement involving 34,000 personnel, 36 warships and over 220 aircraft.

It is the largest combined military operation undertaken in Australia and includes special forces, amphibious landings, parachuting urban operations and live fire exercises used by both nations in preparation of future missions.

This year’s action, which is the seventh of its kind, appeared to draw the interest of Chinese military forces, after a spy ship was spotted “in the vicinity” of the activities.

“The Chinese vessel has remained outside Australian territorial waters but inside the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone in the Coral Sea,” a defence department statement said on Saturday.

“The vessel’s presence has not detracted from the exercise objectives.”

Commander Joint Operations Australian Defence Force Vice Admiral David Johnston said the vessel had acted within the law.

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Cyberwarfare Makes Cold Wars Hotter

Cyberwarfare Makes Cold Wars Hotter.

Cyberspace, a domain created not by nature but by human beings, has emerged to provide tremendous benefits, but also to present new risks. Recently, cyber security has become a national policy issue. Driven predominantly by national security concerns, democracies have formulated national cyber strategies. Cyberspace refers to inter-connected information technology infrastructures comprising computers, computer-embedded systems, telecommunication networks, the world wide web and the internet, including the information transmitted and processed within these systems. The public internet is only one part of cyberspace. Other parts include mission-specific systems that vary widely in size and complexity and control the function of various obscure processes; these control functions gradually become computerised. The term “cyber,” derived from the Greek, refers to the control element. Technologically identical methods are used to gain unauthorised access to computer resources for most cyber operations, regardless of the intended purpose: crime, terrorism, industrial espionage, military espionage, or warfare. Indeed, novel cyber attacks on critical national infrastructure are likely to severely disrupt social activities if successful. It has become theoretically possible to exploit the properties of today’s cyberspace to attack strategic targets remotely. Furthermore, the attacker risks significantly less in cyberspace due to the widespread use of vulnerable commercial off-the-shelf technologies, the difficulty of distinguishing a glitch from malicious action, and the challenges of identifying the attackers. Centrally, war is a violent act, where the threat of force and violence is instrumental to achieving a political goal. Neither denial-of-service, web hacking, nor espionage are even potentially violent, even when Stuxnet is considered – no cyber incident has yet been violent nor caused loss of human life. Since none of the cyber events have yet met the requirements to constitute a war, the “cyberwar” metaphor should be relinquished, at least for the time being. Cyber security is not simply a clear-cut technical issue. It is a strategic, political, and social phenomenon with all the accompanying messy nuances. Therefore, cyber reality must be examined with a scientific rigour by all disciplines, enabling an informed public debate. It is both morally essential and rationally effective for the responses to be formulated through a democratic process. Credit: Lior Tabansky for Cyber Security Review 2017.

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-cyberwarfare-makes-cold-wars-hotter-1500811201

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US, Australian ‘war games’ exercise ends

Evolving technological capabilities are adding a complex cyber warfare component to defence operations like the joint US and Australian training exercise off Queensland, a top American admiral says.

The comments from the commander of the United States Pacific Fleet, Admiral Scott Swift, came as Operation Talisman Sabre wound up on Tuesday.

More than 30,000 personnel from both nations took part in the three-week long, mid-intensity training exercise.

Air, land and maritime training exercises were undertaken as part of the biennial engagement off the Queensland coast, but added to the operation for the first time was cyber warfare.

Talisman Sabre’s purpose was to ensure the two allies were interoperable as well as strengthening their response capacity.

Admiral Swift said the addition of cyber warfare activities had set the operation apart from previous war games.

“I look at it as the most complex Talisman Sabre we’ve ever done, and we also discussed this morning that we have to keep pushing that complexity because the problems in the world are not getting easier,” he said aboard the flagship American aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan in Brisbane.

“I wish they were getting easier but they’re not.”

The 333 metre long, nuclear-powered carrier docked at the Port of Brisbane on Sunday, giving its crew of thousands a chance to explore the Queensland capital.

Australian and US forces take part in the exercise every two years, with this year’s engagement involving 34,000 personnel, 36 warships and over 220 aircraft.

It is the largest combined military operation undertaken in Australia and includes special forces, amphibious landings, parachuting urban operations and live fire exercises used by both nations in preparation of future missions.

This year’s action, which is the seventh of its kind, appeared to draw the interest of Chinese military forces, after a spy ship was spotted “in the vicinity” of the activities.

“The Chinese vessel has remained outside Australian territorial waters but inside the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone in the Coral Sea,” a defence department statement said on Saturday.

“The vessel’s presence has not detracted from the exercise objectives.”

Commander Joint Operations Australian Defence Force Vice Admiral David Johnston said the vessel had acted within the law.

© Nine Digital Pty Ltd 2017

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