Event ID 356 — Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Event ID 356 — Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

When a client requests on-demand content, a cache/proxy server can stream the requested content to the client on behalf of the origin server. Offsetting the load on the origin server from which the content is published conserves bandwidth and decreases network-imposed latency, reducing costs and providing a better viewing experience for clients. The WMS Cache/Proxy plug-in in Windows Media Services 2008 is used to configure a Windows Media server as a cache/proxy server. This plug-in downloads content requested by clients from an origin server to cache storage on the cache/proxy server (the cache directory) for subsequent delivery to clients.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 356
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CACHE_DELETED_LRU
Message: The WMS Cache Proxy plug-in removed %1 from the cache directory to increase the disk space available for caching content.

Resolve

This is a normal condition. No further action is required.

Related Management Information

Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 355 — Cache/Proxy Database Availability

Event ID 355 — Cache/Proxy Database Availability

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

When a client requests on-demand content, a cache/proxy server can stream the requested content to the client on behalf of the origin server. Offsetting the load on the origin server from which the content is published conserves bandwidth and decreases network-imposed latency, reducing costs and providing a better viewing experience for clients. The WMS Cache/Proxy plug-in in Windows Media Services 2008 is used to configure a Windows Media server as a cache/proxy server. This plug-in downloads content requested by clients from an origin server to cache storage on the cache/proxy server (the cache directory) for subsequent delivery to clients. A record of each downloaded file is maintained in a cache index file (the cache database) so that the plug-in can be used to manage the cache directory.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 355
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CACHE_INDEX_OPEN_FAILED
Message: The WMS Cache Proxy plug-in could not open the cache database index %1. %2

Diagnose

This error is caused by one of the following conditions:

  • The Network Service account does not have appropriate permissions for the cache directory on the cache/proxy server.
  • The cache index file on the cache/proxy server is missing.

The Network Service account does not have appropriate permissions for the cache directory on the cache/proxy server

To determine the Network Service account permissions for the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media cache/proxy server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to cache content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, note the cache directory path value in Cache Directory Path. The default value is %systemdrive%\WMSCache.
  7. In Windows Explorer, right-click the cache folder, and then click Properties.
  8. On the Security tab, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  9. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, view the permissions allowed for the Network Service account.
  10. If the Network Service account does not have Read, Write, and Modify permissions to the cache directory, see the section titled “Specify Network Service account permissions for caching.”

The cache index file on the cache/proxy server is missing

To determine whether the cache index file is missing:

  1. On the Windows Media cache/proxy server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to cache content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, note the cache directory path value in Cache Directory Path. The default value is %systemdrive%\WMSCache.
  7. In Windows Explorer, open the cache folder.
  8. If the cache index file named CacheIndex.txt is not present in the cache folder, see the section titled “Create a new cache index file.”

Resolve

To resolve this issue, use the resolution that corresponds to the cause you identified in the Diagnose section. After performing the resolution, see the Verify section to confirm that the feature is operating properly

Cause

Resolution

The Network Service account does not have appropriate permissions for the cache directory on the cache/proxy server

Specify Network Service account permissions for caching

The cache index file on the cache/proxy server is missing

Create a new cache index file

Specify Network Service account permissions for caching

Windows Media Services uses the Network Service account to manage the content files that are cached in %systemdrive%\WMSCache and its subdirectories on the cache/proxy server. By default, the Network Service account has Read, Write, and Modify permissions to the WMSCache directory and its subdirectories.

If the specified cache folder does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMSCache, you must specify permissions on the alternate cache folder for the Network Service account on the cache/proxy server.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for caching:

  1. On the Windows Media cache/proxy server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to cache content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, note the cache directory path value in Cache Directory Path. The default value is %systemdrive%\WMSCache.
  7. In Windows Explorer, right-click the cache folder, and then click Properties.
  8. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  9. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  10. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  11. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  12. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read, Write, Modify.
  13. Click OK to save the changes.

Create a new cache index file

To create a new cache index file, you must empty the cache directory on the cache/proxy server. The next time a client requests content, the cache/proxy server will download the requested content from the origin server and create a new cache index file that includes an entry for the content.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To empty the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media cache/proxy server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to cache content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, note the cache directory path value in Cache Directory Path. The default value is %systemdrive%\WMSCache.
  7. In Windows Explorer, open the cache folder.
  8. Select all files and folders in the cache folder, and then delete them.

Verify

To verify that cache/proxy servers on your network can cache content files from the origin server, prestuff the cache directory on the cache/proxy servers with one or more content files from the origin server. Prestuffing content means that you are caching the content on the cache/proxy servers before it is requested by clients. It is a good way to confirm that cache/proxy servers on your network can communicate with the origin server.

To prestuff the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Prestuff tab, use one of the following procedures:
    • Prestuff from Stream. Select this option to enable the cache/proxy server to cache the content by streaming it from the origin server. Type the URL of the file on the origin server in the URL box and select one of the Prestuff Rate options to specify the speed at which the cache/proxy server streams the content from the origin server.
    • Prestuff from File. Select this option to enable the cache proxy server to cache the content from a file on an available file storage system, such as a local file system, storage area network (SAN), or network-attached storage (NAS). Type the UNC path of the file in the Content Path box, the URL that clients must use to stream the file in the Stream URL box, and then select the Copy content to local cache directory check box.
  7. Click Prestuff to start caching the specified content from the origin server. If caching is configured correctly on the cache/proxy server, the content file will appear in the cache directory after a short delay.

Related Management Information

Cache/Proxy Database Availability

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 354 — Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Event ID 354 — Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

When a client requests on-demand content, a cache/proxy server can stream the requested content to the client on behalf of the origin server. Offsetting the load on the origin server from which the content is published conserves bandwidth and decreases network-imposed latency, reducing costs and providing a better viewing experience for clients. The WMS Cache/Proxy plug-in in Windows Media Services 2008 is used to configure a Windows Media server as a cache/proxy server. This plug-in downloads content requested by clients from an origin server to cache storage on the cache/proxy server (the cache directory) for subsequent delivery to clients.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 354
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CACHE_REMOVE_FAILED
Message: The WMS Cache Proxy plug-in could not remove %1 from the cache directory. %2

Resolve
Specify Network Service account permissions for caching

Windows Media Services uses the Network Service account to manage the content files that are cached in %systemdrive%\WMSCache and its subdirectories on the cache/proxy server. By default, the Network Service account has Read, Write, and Modify permissions to the WMSCache directory and its subdirectories.

If the specified cache folder does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMSCache, you must specify permissions on the alternate cache folder for the Network Service account on the cache/proxy server.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for caching:

  1. On the Windows Media cache/proxy server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to cache content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, note the cache directory path value in Cache Directory Path. The default value is %systemdrive%\WMSCache.
  7. In Windows Explorer, right-click the cache folder, and then click Properties.
  8. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  9. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  10. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  11. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  12. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read, Write, Modify.
  13. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that cache/proxy servers on your network can cache content files from the origin server, prestuff the cache directory on the cache/proxy servers with one or more content files from the origin server. Prestuffing content means that you are caching the content on the cache/proxy servers before it is requested by clients. It is a good way to confirm that cache/proxy servers on your network can communicate with the origin server.

To prestuff the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Prestuff tab, use one of the following procedures:
    • Prestuff from Stream. Select this option to enable the cache/proxy server to cache the content by streaming it from the origin server. Type the URL of the file on the origin server in the URL box and select one of the Prestuff Rate options to specify the speed at which the cache/proxy server streams the content from the origin server.
    • Prestuff from File. Select this option to enable the cache proxy server to cache the content from a file on an available file storage system, such as a local file system, storage area network (SAN), or network-attached storage (NAS). Type the UNC path of the file in the Content Path box, the URL that clients must use to stream the file in the Stream URL box, and then select the Copy content to local cache directory check box.
  7. Click Prestuff to start caching the specified content from the origin server. If caching is configured correctly on the cache/proxy server, the content file will appear in the cache directory after a short delay.

Related Management Information

Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 353 — Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Event ID 353 — Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

When a client requests on-demand content, a cache/proxy server can stream the requested content to the client on behalf of the origin server. Offsetting the load on the origin server from which the content is published conserves bandwidth and decreases network-imposed latency, reducing costs and providing a better viewing experience for clients. The WMS Cache/Proxy plug-in in Windows Media Services 2008 is used to configure a Windows Media server as a cache/proxy server. This plug-in downloads content requested by clients from an origin server to cache storage on the cache/proxy server (the cache directory) for subsequent delivery to clients.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 353
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CACHE_DOWNLOAD_FAILED
Message: The WMS Cache Proxy plug-in could not cache %1 to the cache directory. %2

Diagnose

This error is caused by one of the following conditions:

  • The cache directory on the cache/proxy server is full.
  • The origin server is either not available or too busy to process the cache download request.

The cache directory on the cache/proxy server is full

To determine whether the cache directory is full:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, note the cache directory path value in Cache Directory Path. The default value is %systemdrive%\WMSCache.
  7. In the Cache Settings area, note the values for the following options that specify how much space is available for cached file storage in the cache folder:
    • Limit Disk Quota (MB). The amount of space in the cache folder for storing on-demand files.
    • Limit Archive Quota per Stream (MB). The amount of space available in the cache folder for storing a single on-demand file that is created from a live stream by the Play While Archiving feature.
  8. In Windows Explorer, open the cache folder, and then determine how much space is consumed by the cached files.
  9. If the total amount of disk space consumed by the files in cache folder is nearing either of the specified quota limits, see the section titled “Make disk space available for cache file storage.”

The origin server is either not available or too busy to process the cache download request

To determine origin server availability:

  1. Use the Ping command to test the local area network (LAN) connection to the origin server.
  2. If you can connect to the origin server, diagnose potential bandwidth bottleneck issues on the network. For more information, see Bandwidth.

For more information about resolving this issue, see the section titled “Optimize streaming media network availability.”

Resolve

To resolve this issue, use the resolution that corresponds to the cause you identified in the Diagnose section. After performing the resolution, see the Verify section to confirm that the feature is operating properly

Cause

Resolution

The cache directory on the cache/proxy server is full

Make disk space available for cache file storage

The origin server is either not available or too busy to process the cache download request

Optimize streaming media network availability

Make disk space available for cache file storage

There are several methods available to you for making additional storage space available for cached files on the cache/proxy server. Possible resolutions include:

  • Change the disk space storage limit for the cache directory.
  • Remove cached files from the cache directory.
  • Change the cache directory to another location that has sufficient disk space.

Change the disk space storage limit for the cache directory

To change the disk space storage limit for the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, in Cache Settings, use one of the following procedures:
    • If you are storing on-demand content files in the cache directory, select the Limit Disk Quota (MB) check box and then specify a higher capacity value for storing cached files.
    • If you are storing a single on-demand file that is created from a live stream by the Play While Archiving feature in the cache directory, select the Limit Archive Quota per Stream (MB) check box and then specify a higher capacity value for storing the cached file.

Remove files from the cache directory

To remove files from the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, use one of the following procedures:
    • On the Cache tab, click Clear Cache to remove all files stored in the cache directory.
    • On the Query tab, search for files in the cache directory to remove, and then click Delete to remove the files from the results list.

Note: Cached content actively being streamed by clients is marked for deletion and is deleted when the last user session ends. If another client requests cached content that has been marked for deletion or has been deleted, the cache/proxy server will download another copy of the content from the origin server to fulfill the request.

Change the cache directory

To change the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, in Cache Settings, click Browse to select another cache directory.

Optimize streaming media network availability

If the cache/proxy server cannot connect to the origin server on the network, resolve any problems with the network adapter. (For more information, see Troubleshooting network and dial-up connections.) If the network is functioning normally, investigate and resolve potential bandwidth bottleneck issues on the network. (For more information, see Bandwidth.) If the network is tuned correctly, try restricting the cache download caching speed on the cache/proxy server to the available bandwidth.

To restrict the cache download caching speed to the available bandwidth:

  1. On the Windows Media cache/proxy server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to cache content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Cache tab, in Caching Speed, select the Maximum Available Bandwidth option to allow caching of content from the origin server as fast as the network will allow.
  7. Click OK to save the changes.

Note: If the network is operating near maximum capacity, the cache download speed may still be slow. A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that you must have to ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, see Capacity planning. To test the capacity of your Windows Media server, you can simulate client requests for unicast streams from the server by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator.

Verify

To verify that cache/proxy servers on your network can cache content files from the origin server, prestuff the cache directory on the cache/proxy servers with one or more content files from the origin server. Prestuffing content means that you are caching the content on the cache/proxy servers before it is requested by clients. It is a good way to confirm that cache/proxy servers on your network can communicate with the origin server.

To prestuff the cache directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you are caching content files.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Cache/Proxy Management.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Cache Proxy, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Cache Proxy Properties dialog box, on the Prestuff tab, use one of the following procedures:
    • Prestuff from Stream. Select this option to enable the cache/proxy server to cache the content by streaming it from the origin server. Type the URL of the file on the origin server in the URL box and select one of the Prestuff Rate options to specify the speed at which the cache/proxy server streams the content from the origin server.
    • Prestuff from File. Select this option to enable the cache proxy server to cache the content from a file on an available file storage system, such as a local file system, storage area network (SAN), or network-attached storage (NAS). Type the UNC path of the file in the Content Path box, the URL that clients must use to stream the file in the Stream URL box, and then select the Copy content to local cache directory check box.
  7. Click Prestuff to start caching the specified content from the origin server. If caching is configured correctly on the cache/proxy server, the content file will appear in the cache directory after a short delay.

Related Management Information

Cache/Proxy Directory Availability

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 352 — Unicast Streaming

Event ID 352 — Unicast Streaming

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Unicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the distribution of content using unicast streaming, the default method by which a Windows Media server delivers content. A unicast stream is a one-to-one connection between the server and a client, which means that each client receives a distinct stream and only those clients that request the stream receive it. It offers the benefits of interactivity between a player and server, easier setup, and multiple-bit-rate (MBR) streaming capability. However, the number of users that are able to receive unicast streams is limited by content bit rate and the speed of the server network. For more information, see Delivering content as a unicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 352
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_NACKS_WARNING
Message: The number of negative acknowledgements (NACKs) received by the Windows Media server exceeded the NACK warning limit. The server received %1 NACK requests in %2 milliseconds.

Resolve
Protect against denial-of-service attacks

Ordinarily, negative acknowledgement (NACK) requests occur when the server or network is overloaded and packets cannot be sent through the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) reliably. Clients must request that packets be resent. This NACK warning limit in Windows Media Services is set so that only a very high number of NACK requests, a condition that indicates a denial-of-service attack, cause this issue.

First, confirm that bandwidth bottleneck issues on the network are not causing the problem. For more information, see Bandwidth. If the network does not appear to be at fault, review the server log files to determine whether clients are instigating a denial-of-service attack by flooding the network with content requests so that the server cannot respond adequately to legitimate client requests for content. If your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, the log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack. For more information about the fields used in Windows Media server log files, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Note: A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, see Capacity planning. To test the capacity of your Windows Media server, you can simulate client requests for unicast streams from the server by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator.

Verify

To verify that the unicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  7. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  8. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Note: To ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, perform network load tests by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator to determine the maximum capacity of your server, and then make the appropriate adjustments to the Limits properties in Windows Media Services that specify the Windows Media server performance boundaries. A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your transmission does not exceed the capabilities of your server, network, or audience, see Capacity planning.

Related Management Information

Unicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 351 — Multicast Streaming

Event ID 351 — Multicast Streaming

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Multicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the multicast distribution of content. Multicast streaming is a one-to-many relationship between a Windows Media server and the clients receiving the stream. With a multicast stream, the server streams to a multicast IP address on the network, and all clients receive the same stream by subscribing to the IP address. Because there is only one stream from the server regardless of the number of clients receiving the stream, a multicast stream requires the same amount of bandwidth as a single unicast stream containing the same content. For more information, see Delivering content as a multicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 351
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_MULTICAST_FORMAT_NOT_FOUND
Message: Stream format information could not be found for the multicast broadcast.

Resolve
Create a new multicast information file

Run the Multicast Announcement Wizard for the broadcast publishing point to create a new multicast information file.

To start the Multicast Announcement Wizard:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, right-click the broadcast publishing point for the multicast content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Announce tab.
  4. In Connect to a multicast stream, click Run Multicast Announcement Wizard.

Note: For information about completing the wizard, see Working with the Multicast Announcement Wizard.

Verify

To verify that the multicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the broadcast publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab.
  5. In the Connect to a multicast stream area, click Run Multicast Announcement Wizard to create a multicast information file (a file with an .nsc file name extension). This file contains information that the Player needs to decode and stream the multicast broadcast. For more information about completing the wizard, see Working with the Multicast Announcement Wizard.
  6. Use the announcement files created by the wizard to access the multicast broadcast in Windows Media Player. For more information, see Testing the announcement file.

Related Management Information

Multicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 350 — Multicast Streaming

Event ID 350 — Multicast Streaming

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Multicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the multicast distribution of content. Multicast streaming is a one-to-many relationship between a Windows Media server and the clients receiving the stream. With a multicast stream, the server streams to a multicast IP address on the network, and all clients receive the same stream by subscribing to the IP address. Because there is only one stream from the server regardless of the number of clients receiving the stream, a multicast stream requires the same amount of bandwidth as a single unicast stream containing the same content. For more information, see Delivering content as a multicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 350
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_MULTICAST_SINK_STOPPED
Message: The multicast broadcast stopped. A socket error occurred.

Resolve
Select a different IP address for multicasting

First, make sure that the local area network (LAN) cable is plugged into the network adapter on the Windows Media server. If the cable is connected, select an alternate IP address from which to multicast.

This procedure requires that you have multiple network interface cards or multiple virtual IP addresses on the Windows Media server.

To select an alternate IP address from which to multicast:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, right-click the broadcast publishing point for the multicast content, and then click Stop.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Multicast streaming.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Multicast Data Writer, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Multicast Data Writer Properties dialog box, click the Advanced tab.
  7. In IP address of the network interface card to multicast from, select an alternate IP address.
  8. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the multicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the broadcast publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab.
  5. In the Connect to a multicast stream area, click Run Multicast Announcement Wizard to create a multicast information file (a file with an .nsc file name extension). This file contains information that the Player needs to decode and stream the multicast broadcast. For more information about completing the wizard, see Working with the Multicast Announcement Wizard.
  6. Use the announcement files created by the wizard to access the multicast broadcast in Windows Media Player. For more information, see Testing the announcement file.

Related Management Information

Multicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 349 — Unicast Streaming

Event ID 349 — Unicast Streaming

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

You can configure Unicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the distribution of content using unicast streaming, the default method by which a Windows Media server delivers content. A unicast stream is a one-to-one connection between the server and a client, which means that each client receives a distinct stream and only those clients that request the stream receive it. It offers the benefits of interactivity between a player and server, easier setup, and multiple-bit-rate (MBR) streaming capability. However, the number of users that are able to receive unicast streams is limited by content bit rate and the speed of the server network. For more information, see Delivering content as a unicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 349
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_STOP_RECEIVING_NACKS
Message: The number of negative acknowledgements (NACKs) received by the Windows Media server exceeded the NACK warning limit. The server received %1 NACK requests in %2 milliseconds. The server will stop receiving NACK requests for %3 milliseconds so that it can recover.

Resolve
Protect against denial-of-service attacks

Ordinarily, negative acknowledgement (NACK) requests occur when the server or network is overloaded and packets cannot be sent through the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) reliably. Clients must request that packets be resent. This NACK warning limit in Windows Media Services is set so that only a very high number of NACK requests, a condition that indicates a denial-of-service attack, cause this issue.

First, confirm that bandwidth bottleneck issues on the network are not causing the problem. For more information, see Bandwidth. If the network does not appear to be at fault, review the server log files to determine whether clients are instigating a denial-of-service attack by flooding the network with content requests so that the server cannot respond adequately to legitimate client requests for content. If your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, the log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack. For more information about the fields used in Windows Media server log files, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Note: A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, see Capacity planning. To test the capacity of your Windows Media server, you can simulate client requests for unicast streams from the server by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator.

Verify

To verify that the unicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  7. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  8. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Note: To ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, perform network load tests by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator to determine the maximum capacity of your server, and then make the appropriate adjustments to the Limits properties in Windows Media Services that specify the Windows Media server performance boundaries. A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your transmission does not exceed the capabilities of your server, network, or audience, see Capacity planning.

Related Management Information

Unicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 348 — Unicast Logging

Event ID 348 — Unicast Logging

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Logging plug-ins in Windows Media Services to keep a record, a log file, of client and server activity during a streaming session. Log information can also help:

  • Track server usage so that you can decide when you might need to add more resources to your system.
  • Assist you in planning your security implementation. For example, if your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack.
  • Identify user-reported issues with your streaming system by providing event codes that correspond to common issues.
  • Provide historical data for use in trend analysis and business cases.

For more information, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 348
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_LOGGING_OPEN_SUCCEEDED_WITH_NO_HEADER
Message: The WMS Client Logging plug-in opened the unicast log file ‘%1’ but cannot log data to the file. Logging will start when sufficient disk space is available.

Resolve
Make disk space available for log file storage

To resolve this issue, do either of the following:

  • Make space available in the current log directory.
  • Change the log directory.

Make space available in the current log directory

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To make space available in the current log directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the on-demand publishing point for which you are logging data.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Logging.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Client Logging, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Client Logging Properties dialog box, on the General tab, note the log directory path in Currently logging to.
  7. In Windows Explorer, remove log files from the log folder to make additional storage space available, or perform the following procedure to specify a new log directory that has sufficient disk space.

Note: By default, the WMS Client Logging plug-in stops logging when the amount of free disk space drops to 10 percent. This prevents the log file from taking up all the hard disk. However, there are some scenarios where it is not realistic to stop logging after this threshold is reached. For example, if a hard disk is 100 gigabytes (GB), the plug-in stops logging when only 10 GB of hard disk space remains free. You can use the Windows Media Services 9 Series Object Model to configure the WMS Client Logging plug-in to stop logging at different thresholds. For more information, see article 812635, “INFO: Supplemental Logging Information for Windows Media Services 9 Series,” in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

Change the log directory

To change the log directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the on-demand publishing point for which you are logging data.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Logging.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Client Logging, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Client Logging Properties dialog box, on the General tab, in Directory, click Browse to select a new directory for log file storage.

Note: If you make additional free disk space available in the current log directory, the plug-in will try to log data to the unicast log file immediately. If you change the unicast logging path template to reference another location that has sufficient space for logging, the plug-in will not try to log data until the beginning of the next log cycle period. To begin logging to the new location immediately, click Cycle Now in the WMS Client Logging Properties dialog box.

Verify

To verify that the client logs are being created correctly, test a stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. In Windows Media Services, in the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts a stream that you want to test.
  3. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  4. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  5. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  6. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  7. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.
  8. View the fields in the log file to confirm that they are filled in correctly. For more information, see Log File Entries Reference.

Note: You can use a Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) value created by Windows Media Player to identify the Player connection to the Windows Media server and view the log entries created by the Player that you use in your test environment. The c-playerid field in the log is used to record the Player ID value. To help protect user privacy, the option to send unique Player identification information to content providers is turned off in Windows Media Player. For Player log entries, if the Player is configured to not send this information, the recorded value in c-playerid is: {3300AD50-2C39-46c0-AE0A-xxxxxxxxxxxx}, where x is the session ID of the client. To identify the log entries generated by the Player in your test environment, you can enable the option to send a unique Player ID on the Privacy tab in Windows Media Player. For more information, see the Windows Media Player Privacy Statement.

Related Management Information

Unicast Logging

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 345 — Unicast Logging

Event ID 345 — Unicast Logging

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Logging plug-ins in Windows Media Services to keep a record, a log file, of client and server activity during a streaming session. Log information can also help:

  • Track server usage so that you can decide when you might need to add more resources to your system.
  • Assist you in planning your security implementation. For example, if your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack.
  • Identify user-reported issues with your streaming system by providing event codes that correspond to common issues.
  • Provide historical data for use in trend analysis and business cases.

For more information, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 345
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_INVALID_CHARACTER_FOUND_IN_PATH_TEMPLATE
Message: Invalid characters were found in the unicast logging path template. The specified path ‘%1’ was replaced with the new path ‘%2’.

Resolve
Update the unicast logging path template

To configure the path template for unicast logging:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the on-demand publishing point for which you want to log data.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Logging.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Client Logging, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Client Logging Properties dialog box, in Directory, enter the path and name for the log file. For more information, see WMS Client Logging.
  7. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the client logs are being created correctly, test a stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. In Windows Media Services, in the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts a stream that you want to test.
  3. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  4. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  5. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  6. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  7. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.
  8. View the fields in the log file to confirm that they are filled in correctly. For more information, see Log File Entries Reference.

Note: You can use a Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) value created by Windows Media Player to identify the Player connection to the Windows Media server and view the log entries created by the Player that you use in your test environment. The c-playerid field in the log is used to record the Player ID value. To help protect user privacy, the option to send unique Player identification information to content providers is turned off in Windows Media Player. For Player log entries, if the Player is configured to not send this information, the recorded value in c-playerid is: {3300AD50-2C39-46c0-AE0A-xxxxxxxxxxxx}, where x is the session ID of the client. To identify the log entries generated by the Player in your test environment, you can enable the option to send a unique Player ID on the Privacy tab in Windows Media Player. For more information, see the Windows Media Player Privacy Statement.

Related Management Information

Unicast Logging

Streaming Media Services

Related: