Event ID 344 — Windows Media Directory Playlist Delivery

Event ID 344 — Windows Media Directory Playlist Delivery

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

Directory playlists are the contents of a folder that you can stream to clients much like a server-side playlist streams a sequence of content. You can configure an on-demand publishing point or a broadcast publishing point to stream files from a folder. For more information, see Sourcing from a directory.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 344
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CANNOT_READ_DIRECTORY_PLAYLIST
Message: The WMS Directory Playlist Parser cannot read the directory ‘%1’ on publishing point ‘%2’.

Resolve
Specify Network Service account permissions for the directory

Windows Media Services uses the Network Service account to access digital media content and playlists that are stored in %systemdrive%\WMPub and its subdirectories. By default, the Network Service account has Read permissions to the WMPub directory and its subdirectories.

If the specified content source does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, you must specify Read permissions on the alternate content source for the Network Service account.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for directory playlists:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the publishing point that sources from the directory.
  3. In the details pane, click the Source tab.
  4. In Content source, note the directory path (for example, C:\WMA\).
  5. In Windows Explorer, right-click the content source folder, and then click Properties.
  6. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  7. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  8. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  9. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  10. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read.
  11. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the directory playlist can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Directory Playlist Delivery

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 343 — Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Event ID 343 — Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

When you use a server-side playlist, you can stream multiple pieces of digital media content as you would with a playlist created by using Windows Media Player (called a client-side playlist). However, in a server-side playlist, you can use additional attributes to further control the behavior of the content. Server-side playlists that are created by content producers, server administrators, or Web page scripts are saved as Windows Media metafiles with a .wsx file name extension.

Windows Media Services includes the Windows Media Playlist Editor, which can be used to create and edit server-side playlists. For more information, see Creating and editing playlists.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 343
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CANNOT_READ_PLAYLIST
Message: The playlist file ‘%1’ on publishing point ‘%2’ cannot be read.

Resolve
Specify Network Service account permissions for the content source directory

Make sure that the server-side playlist is not opened by another program, such as Windows Media Playlist Editor. If the file is not being used by another program, specify Network Service account permissions for the content source directory

Windows Media Services uses the Network Service account to access digital media content that is stored in %systemdrive%\WMPub and its subdirectories. By default, the Network Service account has Read permissions to the WMPub directory and its subdirectories.

The src attribute of a media element in a server-side playlist identifies the content source using a URL, Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path, or an absolute path. If the specified content source does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, you must specify Read permissions on the alternate content source for the Network Service account.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for content sources:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the publishing point that sources from the server-side playlist file.
  3. In the details pane, click the Source tab.
  4. In Content source, note the path of the playlist file (for example, C:\WMPub\WMRoot\playlist.wsx).
  5. In Windows Explorer, open the playlist file in a text editor such as Notepad.
  6. Note the content source file locations specified by the src attributes in the playlist. For example, the following sample playlist shows that the files Title.jpg and Audio.wma are stored in C:\WMA:

    <?wsx version=’1.0′?>

    <smil>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\title.jpg” dur=”10s”/>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\audio.wma”/>

    </smil>

  7. If a specified content source does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, in Windows Explorer, right-click the folder that contains the content source specified by the src attribute in the playlist, and then click Properties.
  8. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  9. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  10. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  11. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  12. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read.
  13. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the server-side playlist can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 341 — Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Event ID 341 — Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

When you use a server-side playlist, you can stream multiple pieces of digital media content as you would with a playlist created by using Windows Media Player (called a client-side playlist). However, in a server-side playlist, you can use additional attributes to further control the behavior of the content. Server-side playlists that are created by content producers, server administrators, or Web page scripts are saved as Windows Media metafiles with a .wsx file name extension.

Windows Media Services includes the Windows Media Playlist Editor, which can be used to create and edit server-side playlists. For more information, see Creating and editing playlists.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 341
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_PLAYLIST_PLAYER_STREAM_ERROR_EX
Message: The publishing point ‘%1’ cannot stream the media source from ‘%2’. The media source is referenced by ‘%3’.

Resolve
Add content specified by media elements in the nested playlist

Make sure that the server-side playlist is not opened by another program, such as Windows Media Playlist Editor. If the file is not being used by another program, add the missing media source into the location referenced by the media element, and then verify that the Network Service account has Read permissions for the folder that contains the media source.

Add missing content specified by media elements in a nested playlist

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To add missing content specified by media elements in a nested playlist:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the publishing point that sources from the server-side playlist file.
  3. In the details pane, click the Source tab.
  4. In Content source, note the path of the playlist file (for example, C:\WMPub\WMRoot\playlist.wsx).
  5. In Windows Explorer, open the playlist file in a text editor such as Notepad.
  6. Find the location of nested playlist files specified by the src attribute. For example, the following sample playlist shows that the nested playlist file WMA_playlist.wsx is stored in C:\WMA\:

    <?wsx version=’1.0′?>

    <smil>

        <media src=”title.jpg” dur=”10s”/>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\wma_playlist.wsx”/>

    </smil>

  7. In Windows Explorer, open the nested playlist file in a text editor.
  8. Verify that the content source files in the playlist are in the locations specified by the src attribute. For example, the following sample playlist shows that the files Audio1.wma and Audio2.wma are stored in the folder that has the playlist file:

    <?wsx version=’1.0′?>

    <smil>

        <media src=”audio1.wma”/>

        <media src=”audio2.wma”/>

    </smil>

  9. Add any missing content source files referenced by the src attributes in the playlist to their specified locations.

Specify Network Service account permissions for content sources

The src attribute can identify the content source of a media element by using a URL, Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path, or an absolute path. If the specified content source does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, you must specify Read permissions for the alternate content source for the Network Service account.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for content sources:

  1. In Windows Explorer, right-click the folder that contains the content source specified by the src attribute in the playlist, and then click Properties. For example, the following sample playlist shows that the files title.jpg and audio.wma are stored in C:\WMA:

    <?wsx version=’1.0′?>

    <smil>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\title.jpg” dur=”10s”/>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\audio.wma”/>

    </smil>

  2. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  3. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  4. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  5. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  6. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read.
  7. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the server-side playlist can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 340 — Windows Media Services Plug-in Configuration

Event ID 340 — Windows Media Services Plug-in Configuration

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

Plug-ins and properties are used at the server and publishing point levels to control the operation and configuration of Windows Media Services. They are grouped into categories to identify their functions on the server. The available plug-ins and properties differ, depending on which version of Windows Server 2008 that you are running. (For more information, see Decide which version of Windows Server is right for you.) For more information about using the plug-ins and properties in Windows Media Services, see Working with plug-ins and properties.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 340
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_PLUGIN_REQUIRES_ENTERPRISE_SERVER
Message: The plug-in ‘%1’ cannot be loaded on this version of Windows.

Resolve
Install a supported Windows Server operating system

Plug-ins that support the advanced streaming features in Windows Media Services are only available when Windows Media Services is running on either Windows Server 2008 Enterprise or Windows Server 2008 Datacenter. These plug-ins are not available when Windows Media Services is running on Windows Server 2008 Standard or Windows Web Server 2008. For more information about the Windows Server operating system that will best meet your needs, see Decide which version of Windows Server is right for you.

Install a version of Windows Server 2008 that supports the advanced streaming features in Windows Media Services (either Windows Server 2008 Enterprise or Windows Server 2008 Datacenter), and then install Windows Media Services on the new platform.

Verify

To verify that a plug-in can be used in Windows Media Services:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the publishing point for which you want to enable the plug-in.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. If you selected the Windows Media server in step 1, select the Show all plug-in categories check box.
  5. In Category, click the plug-in category for the streaming feature that you want to enable. Plug-in categories that are not supported will not be displayed in the Category list.
  6. In Plug-in, view the list of plug-ins that support the streaming feature. Plug-ins that are not supported will not be displayed in the Plug-in list.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Services Plug-in Configuration

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 339 — Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Event ID 339 — Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

When you use a server-side playlist, you can stream multiple pieces of digital media content as you would with a playlist created by using Windows Media Player (called a client-side playlist). However, in a server-side playlist, you can use additional attributes to further control the behavior of the content. Server-side playlists that are created by content producers, server administrators, or Web page scripts are saved as Windows Media metafiles with a .wsx file name extension.

Windows Media Services includes the Windows Media Playlist Editor, which can be used to create and edit server-side playlists. For more information, see Creating and editing playlists.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 339
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_PLAYLIST_PLAYER_STREAM_ERROR
Message: The publishing point ‘%1’ cannot stream the media source from ‘%2’.

Resolve
Add content specified by media elements in the playlist

Make sure that the server-side playlist is not opened by another program, such as Windows Media Playlist Editor. If the file is not being used by another program, add the missing media source into the location referenced by the media element, and then verify that the Network Service account has Read permissions for the folder that contains the media source.

Add missing content specified by media elements in a playlist

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To add missing content specified by media elements in a playlist:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the publishing point that sources from the server-side playlist file.
  3. In the details pane, click the Source tab.
  4. In Content source, note the path of the playlist file (for example, C:\WMPub\WMRoot\playlist.wsx).
  5. In Windows Explorer, open the playlist file in a text editor such as Notepad.
  6. Verify that the content source files in the playlist are in the locations specified by the src attribute. For example, the following sample playlist shows that the files Title.jpg and Audio.wma are stored in the folder that has the playlist file:

    <?wsx version=’1.0′?>

    <smil>

        <media src=”title.jpg” dur=”10s”/>

        <media src=”audio.wma”/>

    </smil>

  7. Add any missing content source files referenced by the src attributes in the playlist to their specified locations.

Specify Network Service account permissions for content sources

The src attribute can identify the content source of a media element by using a URL, Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path, or an absolute path. If the specified content source does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, you must specify Read permissions for the alternate content source for the Network Service account.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for content sources:

  1. In Windows Explorer, right-click the folder that contains the content source specified by the src attribute in the playlist, and then click Properties. For example, the following sample playlist shows that the files title.jpg and audio.wma are stored in C:\WMA:

    <?wsx version=’1.0′?>

    <smil>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\title.jpg” dur=”10s”/>

        <media src=”C:\WMA\audio.wma”/>

    </smil>

  2. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  3. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  4. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  5. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  6. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read.
  7. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the server-side playlist can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Server-side Playlist Delivery

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 337 — Data Transfer Protocols

Event ID 337 — Data Transfer Protocols

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

In Windows Media Services, data transfer protocols are used to stream Windows Media-based content to clients. You can configure Control Protocol plug-ins in Windows Media Services to manage these protocols that control communication between the Windows Media server and clients. You can use these plug-ins to configure Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), protocols that handle the high-level exchange of data. You can also use these plug-ins to configure User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), protocols that manage more fundamental tasks such as network connectivity and packet error correction. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 337
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_ACCEPT_FAILED
Message: Windows Media Services cannot accept client connections on port %1. A control protocol plug-in failed.

Resolve
Enable the control protocol plug-in

If the plug-in stopped running after it was enabled, re-enable the plug-in. If the plug-in was enabled but would not start after the Windows Media server started, reload the plug-in.

Re-enable the control protocol plug-in

To re-enable the control protocol plug-in:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server for which you want to enable the plug-in.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Control protocol.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click the plug-in name, and then click Disable.
  6. In Plug-in, right-click the plug-in name, and then click Enable.

Reload the control protocol plug-in

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To reload the control protocol plug-in:

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Services.
  2. In the list of services, click Windows Media Services.
  3. If the service is stopped, on the Action menu, click Start. If the service is started, on the Action menu, click Restart.
  4. Perform the previous procedure for enabling the control protocol plug-in.

Verify

To verify that the selected control protocols can be used to deliver content to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  7. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Data Transfer Protocols

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 346 — Event Notification

Event ID 346 — Event Notification

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Event Notification plug-ins in Windows Media Services to receive notices of client and server internal events and then respond to changes in the state of the Windows Media server. For example, you can use a script to customize the way that the Windows Media server authorizes and responds to internal events or you can receive notification of internal Windows Media server events through Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) and route them to an external application. To view all the possible internal events that the Windows Media server can report, see Windows Media Services SDK: Internal Events.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 346
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_WMI_ENABLE_FAILED
Message: The WMS WMI Event Handler plug-in did not start.

Resolve
Start the WMS WMI Event Handler plug-in

To start the WMS WMI Event Handler plug-in:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the publishing point for which you want to report WMI events.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Event notification.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS WMI Event Handler, and then click Enable.

Verify

The steps to verify that an Event Notification plug-in is working correctly vary depending on the plug-in that you want to use.

For the WMS Active Script Event Handler plug-in:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the publishing point for which you want to enable script responses to internal events.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Event Notification.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Active Script Event Handler, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Active Script Event Handler Properties dialog box, in File name of script to run, enter the path of the script file.
  7. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Active Script Event Handler, and then click Enable.
  8. The WMS Active Script Event Handler plug-in will respond to event notices raised from the Windows Media server by calling the appropriate callback function in the script file that you created. Verify that the Windows Media server performs the action indicated by the callback function in the script file.

For the WMS WMI Event Handler plug-in:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the publishing point for which you want to receive notification of internal events.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Event Notification.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS WMI Event Handler, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS WMI Event Handler Properties dialog box, in Classes, select which event to report individually or by clicking Select All or Clear All. For more information about the WMI event classes that Windows Media Services reports, see WMS WMI Event Handler.
  7. In Plug-in, right-click WMS WMI Event Handler, and then click Enable.
  8. For each Windows Media Services internal event, the WMS WMI Event Handler plug-in will generate an event notification for other applications by using Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI). Verify that the application receives notifications for the selected events.

Related Management Information

Event Notification

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 335 — Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Delivery

Event ID 335 — Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Delivery

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

Wrapper playlists are a special type of playlist that you can use to implement bumper advertisements on your publishing points. Wrapper playlists enable you to append content to the beginning and end of a unicast stream. You can easily use wrapper playlists to customize a stream with your own branding and message without having to change the content from the content creator. Additionally, wrapper playlists help ensure that users who connect to broadcast publishing points always receive certain content, such as a sponsor identification, disclaimer, or advertisement, regardless of when they connected to the broadcast. For more information, see About wrapper playlists.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 335
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_CANNOT_OPEN_WRAPPER_PLAYLIST
Message: The wrapper playlist file ‘%1’ on publishing point ‘%2’ cannot be opened.

Resolve
Specify Network Service account permissions for the wrapper playlist

Make sure that the wrapper playlist is not opened by another program, such as Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Editor. If the file is not being used by another program, specify Network Service account permissions for the wrapper playlist directory.

Windows Media Services uses the Network Service account to access digital media content and playlists that are stored in %systemdrive%\WMPub and its subdirectories. By default, the Network Service account has Read permissions to the WMPub directory and its subdirectories.

If the specified wrapper playlist does not reside in %systemdrive%\WMPub or in one of its subdirectories, you must specify Read permissions on the alternate playlist source for the Network Service account.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To specify Network Service account permissions for wrapper playlists:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the publishing point that is sourcing from the wrapper playlist file.
  3. In the details pane, click the Advertising tab.
  4. In Wrapper advertisements, in Wrapper location, note the path of the wrapper playlist (for example, C:\WMA\wrapper.wsx).
  5. In Windows Explorer, right-click the folder that contains the wrapper playlist, and then click Properties.
  6. On the Security tab, click Edit.
  7. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, click Add.
  8. In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, in Enter the object names to select, type Network Service, and then click OK.
  9. In the Permissions for <Object name> dialog box, in the Group or user names area, click NETWORK SERVICE.
  10. In the Permissions for NETWORK SERVICE area, click the Allow check box for the following permissions: Read.
  11. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the wrapper playlist can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Related Management Information

Windows Media Wrapper Playlist Delivery

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 333 — Unicast Streaming

Event ID 333 — Unicast Streaming

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

You can configure Unicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the distribution of content using unicast streaming, the default method by which a Windows Media server delivers content. A unicast stream is a one-to-one connection between the server and a client, which means that each client receives a distinct stream and only those clients that request the stream receive it. It offers the benefits of interactivity between a player and server, easier setup, and multiple-bit-rate (MBR) streaming capability. However, the number of users that are able to receive unicast streams is limited by content bit rate and the speed of the server network. For more information, see Delivering content as a unicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 333
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_PROXY_ACCESS_DENIED
Message: The proxy server ‘%1’ is blocking Windows Media server access to clients.

Resolve
Disable UDP packet transmission

To disable UDP packet transmission:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab, and then select the Show all plug-in categories check box.
  4. In Category, click Unicast streaming.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Unicast Data Writer, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Unicast Data Writer Properties dialog box, on the General tab, clear the UDP check box.
  7. Click OK to save the changes.

Note: After you turn off UDP packet transmission in the plug-in, clients that try to receive UDP transmissions through network components that are not UDP-enabled may experience latency during the protocol rollover process. For more information, see About Protocol Rollover.

Verify

To verify that the unicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  7. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  8. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Note: To ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, perform network load tests by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator to determine the maximum capacity of your server, and then make the appropriate adjustments to the Limits properties in Windows Media Services that specify the Windows Media server performance boundaries. A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your transmission does not exceed the capabilities of your server, network, or audience, see Capacity planning.

Related Management Information

Unicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 332 — Broadcast Archiving

Event ID 332 — Broadcast Archiving

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

When you use a broadcast publishing point to stream content, you can configure Archiving plug-ins in Windows Media Services to archive the content to a file as it streams. Archiving is useful when you are streaming content that is not already recorded—for example, a stream from an encoder. The archive file enables you to make the content available for on-demand requests or rebroadcast. You can either wait until the broadcast is over to make the archived content available or you can use the Play While Archiving feature in Windows Media Services to allow clients to stream the archived content, even as the server continues to archive streaming content to the file. For more information, see Archiving content.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 332
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_ARCHIVING_DISK_FULL
Message: The WMS Archive Data Writer plug-in stopped archiving to ‘%1’ because available disk space is running low.

Resolve
Make disk space available for archive file storage

Make additional storage space available on the disk that contains the archive directory or change the archive path template to reference a location that has sufficient free disk space.

Make space available in the current archive directory

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To make space available in the current archive directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the broadcast publishing point for which you are archiving data.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Archiving.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Archive Data Writer, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Archive Data Writer Properties dialog box, on the General tab, note the archive directory path in Directory.
  7. In Windows Explorer, remove files from the archive folder to make additional storage space available, or perform the following procedure to specify a new archive directory that has sufficient disk space.

Change the archive directory

To change the archive directory:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the broadcast publishing point for which you are archiving data.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Archiving.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Archive Data Writer, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Archive Data Writer Properties dialog box, on the General tab, in Directory, click Browse to select a new directory for archive file storage.

Note: If archiving is in progress and the content source is a server-side playlist, the archive file created for the currently playing media element will be closed when archiving stops. When the required free disk space is made available, the archive plug-in will begin archiving the next available item in the playlist.

Verify

To verify that the output from your live broadcast is being archived correctly to a file in the archive directory, set up a Play While Archiving configuration in Windows Media Services to allow a test client to read from the archive file as the Windows Media server writes to it. For more information, see About Play While Archiving. After you have configured Play While Archiving in Windows Media Services, you can view the archive file in Windows Media Player to confirm the quality of the archived broadcast.

To view the archive file in Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to view the file by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that sources from the archive file.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step. You should be able to view the archived broadcast from the beginning of the event; however, you will not be able to fast forward or rewind the content until archiving stops.

Related Management Information

Broadcast Archiving

Streaming Media Services

Related: