Could not locate row in sysobjects for system catalog ‘%.*ls’ in database ‘%.*ls’. This system catalog should exist in all databases. Run DBCC CHECKTABLE on sysobjects in this database.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 906
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 8.0
Component: SQL Engine
Message: Could not locate row in sysobjects for system catalog ‘%.*ls’ in database ‘%.*ls’. This system catalog should exist in all databases. Run DBCC CHECKTABLE on sysobjects in this database.
   
Explanation
The system table specified in the message cannot be found in the expected format and location in the specified database.

Commonly this error will occur after a failed upgrade from SQL Server 7.0 to SQL Server 2000: The specified database was partially upgraded and is not in a usable state. You might also see this error if you try to attach a database to another instance of SQL Server if you use files involved in a failed upgrade. In either of these scenarios, you will most likely see the following line in the SQL Server error log:
Error: 5172, Severity: 16, State: 15

This error can also occur when Microsoft SQL Server detects database corruption. Often, but not always, there will be other data consistency errors in the SQL Server error log or in the DBCC CHECKDB output.

   
User Action
If the error occurs after a failed upgrade, restore the files backed up before the upgrade and try the upgrade process again. If the errors did not first occur after an upgrade, follow the steps below.

HARDWARE FAILURE

Run hardware diagnostics and correct any problems. Also examine the Microsoft Windows NT system and application logs and the SQL Server error log to see if the error occurred as the result of hardware failure. Fix any hardware-related problems.

If you have persistent data inconsistency problems, try to swap out different hardware components to isolate the problem. Check that your system does not have write caching enabled on the disk controller. If you suspect this to be the case, contact your hardware vendor.

Finally, you might find it beneficial to switch to a completely new hardware system, including reformatting the disk drives and reinstalling the operating system.

RESTORE FROM BACKUP

If the problem is not hardware related and a known clean backup is available, restore the database from the backup.

DBCC CHECKDB

If no clean backup is available, execute DBCC CHECKDB without a repair clause to determine the extent of the corruption. DBCC CHECKDB will recommend a repair clause to use. Then, execute DBCC CHECKDB with the appropriate repair clause to repair the corruption.

CAUTION: If you are unsure what effect DBCC CHECKDB with a repair clause has on your data, contact your primary support provider before executing this statement.

If running DBCC CHECKDB with one of the repair clauses does not correct the problem, contact your primary support provider.

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