The File Replication Service is having trouble enabling replication from %1 to %2 for %3 using the DNS name %4. FRS will keep retrying. Following are some of the reasons you would see this warning. [1] FRS can not correctly resolve the DNS name %4 from this computer. [2] FRS is not running on %4. [3] The topology information in the Active Directory for this replica has not yet replicated to all the Domain Controllers. This event log message will appear once per connection, After the problem is fixed you will see another event log message indicating that the connection has been established.

Details
Product: Windows Operating System
Event ID: 13508
Source: FRS
Version: 5.2
Symbolic Name: EVENT_FRS_LONG_JOIN
Message: The File Replication Service is having trouble enabling replication
from %1 to %2 for %3 using the DNS name %4. FRS will keep retrying.
Following are some of the reasons you would see this warning.

[1] FRS can not correctly resolve the DNS name %4 from this computer.
[2] FRS is not running on %4.
[3] The topology information in the Active Directory for this replica has not
yet replicated to all the Domain Controllers.

This event log message will appear once per connection, After the problem
is fixed you will see another event log message indicating that the connection
has been established.

   
Explanation

This message informs you that the File Replication service (FRS) cannot complete the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) connection to a specific replication partner because FRS cannot enable replication with that partner. FRS will continue trying to complete the connection.
Because FRS servers gather their replication topology information from their closest Active Directory domain controller (itself on a domain controller that is also an FRS member), a replica partner on another site will not register information about the replica set until the topology information has been replicated to domain controllers on that site. When the topology information finally reaches that distant domain controller, the FRS partner on that site can participate in the replica set, and the FRS 13509 message appears in Event Viewer. Note that intrasite Active Directory replication partners replicate every five minutes. Intersite replication occurs only when the connection schedule is available (the shortest delay is 15 minutes). In addition, FRS polls the topology in Active Directory at defined intervals with a default of five minutes on domain controllers and one hour on other member servers of a replica set. These delays and schedules (especially in topologies with multiple hops) can delay propagation of the FRS replication topology.

   
User Action

To confirm that the problem has been corrected, verify that an FRS 13509 message appears in Event Viewer.

An FRS 13509 message will not appear if FRS is stopped after an FRS 13508 message appears and then is restarted after the communication issue is resolved. In that instance, verify that a message indicating that FRS has started appears and that an FRS 13508 message does not appear again.

If an FRS 13509 message never appears, but a message that replication connections are being made correctly does appear, check for an alternative problem.

To check for an alternative problem

  1. Determine whether the computer listed in the message is working correctly, and verify that FRS is running on it. To verify that FRS is running on the computer displaying the FRS 13508 message, open Services in the Microsoft Management Console (MMC). Double-click File Replication and verify that the Service status is Started.
  2. From the computer displaying the FRS 13508 message, check network connectivity by pinging the . If you cannot contact the domain controller, troubleshoot the problem as a DNS or TCP/IP issue.
  3. Determine whether FRS has ever been able to communicate with the remote computer by looking for an FRS 13509 message in Event Viewer, and review recent management changes to networking, firewalls, DNS configuration, and Active Directory infrastructure to see whether there is a correlation.

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