Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

  • No Related Posts

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

  • No Related Posts

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

  • No Related Posts

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

  • No Related Posts

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

  • No Related Posts

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

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Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related:

Untitled

An overall dip of 7-8% may be seen using a cloud provider but the disk selection is crucial. The dd command was used to write out to disk, bypassing the disk cache and reporting back on a disk’s maximum MB/s. eDirectory requires a minimum of 100 MB/s. Some lower end drive selections were found to drop below 10MB/s at times.
AWS
AWS recommends the use of EBS optimized EC2 instances to get the maximum out of the configured disks.

The links below give a good understanding on how to obtain optimal disk performance through Instance/Volume selection.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-volume-types.html?icmpid=docs_ec2_console

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-optimized.html

Instance type – General Purpose, t2.micro 1 vCPU, 1GB Memory (Non-EBS Optimized, Free instance)

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 7.43317 s, 72.2 MB/s

Instance type – General Purpose, t3.medium 2vCPU, 4GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 1.22511 s, 438 MB/s

Instance type – Memory Optimized & EBS optimized, r5ad.2xlarge 8 vCPU, 64 GB Memory

Disk – Provisioned IOPS SSD, 1000 GB, IOPS – 32000

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/ec2-user/iotest.log bs=64k count=8k conv=fdatasync

8192+0 records in

8192+0 records out

536870912 bytes (537 MB, 512 MiB) copied, 0.684601 s, 784 MB/s

Even a medium level instance of this instance category gave decent throughput. However, it also shows how selecting the low end disk will result in problems.

AZURE
Azure has around 14 Premium SSD Managed disks. We highly recommend a Premium SSD Managed disk over a Standard SSD. However, it is up to a customer’s environment to dictate a minimum required disk type. While throughput and IOPs can be increased by just increasing the disk size there a corresponding increase in cost as well. The bottom line is that disk performance was found to be not uniform across disk sizes. We also sometimes found that the published numbers may not match what is found.
As a benchmark, using the same command, it was observed that a ‘normal’ VM was giving 500MB/s (using a local available host). There are too many permutations available to report on every configuration available and the types are documented on their site.
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-au/pricing/details/managed-disks/
It is hoped these numbers can server as an indicator when customers choose their drive type. Specifically, both the type of disk is important but also is its size.
– Azure P30 disk (1TB)
Listed as 200MB/s but was returning less than 50MB/s.
– Azure P60 disk (1TB)
Listed as 500MB/s but returned 35 MB/s
– Final Maximum Configuration:
VM details:

Memory Optimized – Standard_DS13_v2 (8 vcpus, 56 GiB memory)

Max cached and temp storage throughput: IOPS/MBps (32000/256)

Max uncached disk throughput: IOPS/MBps (25600/384)
Disk details:

P60 Data Disk ( 8 TB, Premium SSD )

Listed as 500 MB/s
Our final results using the dd command showed this configuration was returning 304-297 MB/s. Simply increasing the size makes an enourmous difference. When testing ensure before running the dd command that eDirectory is up and busy as results can be very load dependant. In the final configuration there was only a drop from 304 to 297 MB/s when running a continuous LDAP thread.

Related: