A time out occurred while waiting for memory resources to execute the query. Rerun the query.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 8645
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 10.0
Component: SQLEngine
Symbolic Name: MEMTIMEDOUT_ERR
Message: A time out occurred while waiting for memory resources to execute the query. Rerun the query.
   
Explanation

There is not enough memory in the system to handle the query load.

   
User Action

Either configure the time-out value to be higher or reduce the query load to the server.

The following list outlines general steps that will help in troubleshooting memory errors:

  1. Verify whether other applications or services are consuming memory on this server. Reconfigure less critical applications or services to consume less memory.

  2. Start collecting performance monitor counters for
    SQL Server: Buffer Manager
    ,
    SQL Server: Memory Manager
    .

  3. Check the following SQL Server memory configuration parameters:

    • max server memory

    • min server memory

    • awe enabled

    • min memory per query

    Notice unusual settings. Correct them as necessary. Account for increased memory requirements for SQL Server 2005. Default settings are listed in “Setting Server Configuration Options” in SQL Server Books Online.

  4. If you are using Address Windowing Extensions (AWE), verify that the Windows security setting
    Lock pages in memory
    ‘ is enabled.

  5. Observe DBCC MEMORYSTATUS output and the way it changes when you see these error messages.

  6. Check the workload (for example, number of concurrent sessions, currently executing queries).

The following actions may make more memory available to SQL Server:

  • If applications besides SQL Server are consuming resources, try stopping running these applications or consider running them on a separate server. This will remove external memory pressure.

  • If you have configured
    max server memory,
    increase its setting.

Run the following DBCC commands to free several SQL Server memory caches.

  • DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE

  • DBCC FREESESSIONCACHE

  • DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

If the problem continues, you will need to investigate further and possibly reduce workload.

Related:

Database ‘%.*ls’ is not marked suspect. You cannot drop it with DBCC.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 2573
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 8.0
Component: SQL Engine
Message: Database ‘%.*ls’ is not marked suspect. You cannot drop it with DBCC.
   
Explanation
In earlier versions of SQL Server, DBCC DBREPAIR was used to drop databases that were suspect. To use DBCC DBREPAIR to drop a database, the suspect status must be true for the specified database.

Important DBCC DBREPAIR is included in SQL Server 2000 for backward compatibility only. It is recommended that you use DROP DATABASE to drop damaged databases. In a future versions of SQL Server, DBCC DBREPAIR may not be supported.

   
User Action
To see if a database has been marked suspect, execute the following statement (replace ‘MyDatabaseName’ with the actual database name):

SELECT DATABASEPROPERTYEX( ‘MyDatabaseName’ , ‘Status’)

To drop a suspect database, use the DROP DATABASE command.

Related:

The bulk data provider failed to allocate memory.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 4846
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 9.00.1281.60
Symbolic Name: BULKPROV_MEMORY
Message: The bulk data provider failed to allocate memory.
   
Explanation

Memory allocation failed.

   
User Action

Follow these general steps to troubleshoot memory errors:

  1. Verify whether other applications or services are consuming memory on this server. Reconfigure less critical applications or services to consume less memory.

  2. Start collecting performance monitor counters for SQL Server: Buffer Manager, SQL Server: Memory Manager.

  3. Check the following SQL Server memory configuration parameters:

    • max server memory

    • min server memory

    • awe enabled

    • min memory per query

    Notice any unusual settings. Correct them as necessary. Account for increased memory requirements for SQL Server 2005. Default settings are listed in “Setting Server Configuration Options” in SQL Server Books Online.

  4. If you are using Address Windowing Extensions (AWE), verify that the Windows security setting Lock pages in memory‘ is enabled.

  5. Observe DBCC MEMORYSTATUS output and the way it changes when you see these error messages.

  6. Check the workload (for example, number of concurrent sessions, currently executing queries).

The following actions may make more memory available to SQL Server:

  • If applications besides SQL Server are consuming resources, try stopping running these applications or consider running them on a separate server. This will remove external memory pressure.

  • If you have configured max server memory, increase its setting.

Run the following DBCC commands to free several SQL Server memory caches.

  • DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE

  • DBCC FREESESSIONCACHE

  • DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

If the problem continues, you will need to investigate further and possibly reduce workload.

Related:

System table pre-checks: Object ID %d. Page %S_PGID has unexpected page type %d. Check statement terminated due to unrepairable error.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 7984
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 9.00.1281.60
Symbolic Name: DBCC2_PRE_CHECKS_BAD_PAGE_TYPE
Message: System table pre-checks: Object ID %d. Page %S_PGID has unexpected page type %d. Check statement terminated due to unrepairable error.
   
Explanation

A page with a type other than DATA_PAGE was found in the data level of the specified object. This error is raised during the first phase of the DBCC CHECKDB command checks. During this phase, DBCC CHECKDB performs primitive checks on the data pages of critical system base tables.

If any errors are found in the system tables, the errors cannot be repaired; therefore, the DBCC CHECKDB command ends immediately.

Possible Causes

This error can be caused by one of the following problems:

  • A failure occurs while rolling back an operation that adds a page to the data level.

  • A failed page format.

   
User Action

Look for Hardware Failure

Run hardware diagnostics and correct any problems. Also examine the Microsoft Windows system and application logs and the SQL Server error log to see whether the error occurred as the result of hardware failure. Fix any hardware-related problems that are contained in the logs.

If you have persistent data corruption problems, try to swap out different hardware components to isolate the problem. Check to make sure that the system does not have write-caching enabled on the disk controller. If you suspect write-caching to be the problem, contact your hardware vendor.

Finally, you might find it useful to switch to a new hardware system. This switch may include reformatting the disk drives and reinstalling the operating system.

Restore from Backup

If the problem is not hardware related and a known clean backup is available, restore the database from the backup.

Run DBCC CHECKDB

Not applicable. This error cannot be repaired automatically. If you cannot restore the database from a backup, contact Microsoft Service and Support (CSS).

Related:

Could not locate row in sysobjects for system catalog ‘%.*ls’ in database ‘%.*ls’. This system catalog should exist in all databases. Run DBCC CHECKTABLE on sysobjects in this database.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 906
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 8.0
Component: SQL Engine
Message: Could not locate row in sysobjects for system catalog ‘%.*ls’ in database ‘%.*ls’. This system catalog should exist in all databases. Run DBCC CHECKTABLE on sysobjects in this database.
   
Explanation
The system table specified in the message cannot be found in the expected format and location in the specified database.

Commonly this error will occur after a failed upgrade from SQL Server 7.0 to SQL Server 2000: The specified database was partially upgraded and is not in a usable state. You might also see this error if you try to attach a database to another instance of SQL Server if you use files involved in a failed upgrade. In either of these scenarios, you will most likely see the following line in the SQL Server error log:
Error: 5172, Severity: 16, State: 15

This error can also occur when Microsoft SQL Server detects database corruption. Often, but not always, there will be other data consistency errors in the SQL Server error log or in the DBCC CHECKDB output.

   
User Action
If the error occurs after a failed upgrade, restore the files backed up before the upgrade and try the upgrade process again. If the errors did not first occur after an upgrade, follow the steps below.

HARDWARE FAILURE

Run hardware diagnostics and correct any problems. Also examine the Microsoft Windows NT system and application logs and the SQL Server error log to see if the error occurred as the result of hardware failure. Fix any hardware-related problems.

If you have persistent data inconsistency problems, try to swap out different hardware components to isolate the problem. Check that your system does not have write caching enabled on the disk controller. If you suspect this to be the case, contact your hardware vendor.

Finally, you might find it beneficial to switch to a completely new hardware system, including reformatting the disk drives and reinstalling the operating system.

RESTORE FROM BACKUP

If the problem is not hardware related and a known clean backup is available, restore the database from the backup.

DBCC CHECKDB

If no clean backup is available, execute DBCC CHECKDB without a repair clause to determine the extent of the corruption. DBCC CHECKDB will recommend a repair clause to use. Then, execute DBCC CHECKDB with the appropriate repair clause to repair the corruption.

CAUTION: If you are unsure what effect DBCC CHECKDB with a repair clause has on your data, contact your primary support provider before executing this statement.

If running DBCC CHECKDB with one of the repair clauses does not correct the problem, contact your primary support provider.

Related:

Could not perform the requested operation because the minimum query memory is not available. Decrease the configured value for the ‘min memory per query’ server configuration option.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 8651
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 9.0
Component: SQLEngine
Symbolic Name: MEMGRANT_ERR
Message: Could not perform the requested operation because the minimum query memory is not available. Decrease the configured value for the ‘min memory per query’ server configuration option.
   
Explanation

Other processes are consuming server memory (exerting memory pressure in the server).

   
User Action

Either decrease the configured value for the min memory per query’ server configuration option or reduce the query load to the server.

The following list outlines general steps that will help in troubleshooting memory errors:

  1. Verify whether other applications or services are consuming memory on this server. Reconfigure less critical applications or services to consume less memory.

  2. Start collecting performance monitor counters for
    SQL Server: Buffer Manager
    ,
    SQL Server: Memory Manager
    .

  3. Check the following SQL Server memory configuration parameters:

    • max server memory

    • min server memory

    • awe enabled

    • min memory per query

    Notice unusual settings. Correct them as necessary. Account for increased memory requirements for SQL Server 2005. Default settings are listed in “Setting Server Configuration Options” in SQL Server Books Online.

  4. If you are using Address Windowing Extensions (AWE), verify that the Windows security setting
    Lock pages in memory
    ‘ is enabled.

  5. Observe DBCC MEMORYSTATUS output and the way it changes when you see these error messages.

  6. Check the workload (for example, number of concurrent sessions, currently executing queries).

The following actions may make more memory available to SQL Server:

  • If applications besides SQL Server are consuming resources, try stopping running these applications or consider running them on a separate server. This will remove external memory pressure.

  • If you have configured
    max server memory,
    increase its setting.

Run the following DBCC commands to free several SQL Server memory caches.

  • DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE

  • DBCC FREESESSIONCACHE

  • DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

If the problem continues, you will need to investigate further and possibly reduce workload.

Related:

The log for database ‘%.*ls’ is not available.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 9001
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 10.0
Component: SQLEngine
Symbolic Name: LOG_NOT_AVAIL
Message: The log for database ‘%.*ls’ is not available. Check the event log for related error messages. Resolve any errors and restart the database.
   
Explanation

The database log was taken offline. Usually this signifies a catastrophic failure that requires the database to restart.

   
User Action

Diagnose other errors and restart the instance of SQL Server if it has not already restarted itself.

   
   
Version: 8.0
Component: SQL Engine
Message: The log for database ‘%.*ls’ is not available.
   
Explanation
An I/O error related to data integrity has occurred for the specified database. Either the log or data portion of the database could be damaged. SQL Server has made the log for that database unavailable to prevent further data integrity problems. The I/O error that led to the 9001 message should be reported in the SQL Server error log and/or the Windows event logs.

This error could occur because of a failed ROLLBACK operation. In rare circumstances, the ROLLBACK could fail because of the server is completely out of memory, out of buffer pages, or out of log space.

   
User Action
HARDWARE FAILURE

Run hardware diagnostics and correct any problems. Also examine the Microsoft Windows NT system and application logs and the SQL Server error log to see if the error occurred as the result of hardware failure. Fix any hardware-related problems.

If you have persistent data inconsistency problems, try to swap out different hardware components to isolate the problem. Check that your system does not have write caching enabled on the disk controller. If you suspect this to be the case, contact your hardware vendor.

Finally, you might find it beneficial to switch to a completely new hardware system, including reformatting the disk drives and reinstalling the operating system.

RESTORE FROM BACKUP

If the problem is not hardware related and a known clean backup is available, restore the database from the backup.

DBCC CHECKDB

If no clean backup is available, execute DBCC CHECKDB without a repair clause to determine the extent of the corruption. DBCC CHECKDB will recommend a repair clause to use. Then, execute DBCC CHECKDB with the appropriate repair clause to repair the corruption.

CAUTION: If you are unsure what effect DBCC CHECKDB with a repair clause has on your data, contact your primary support provider before executing this statement.

If running DBCC CHECKDB with one of the repair clauses does not correct the problem, contact your primary support provider.

Related:

A read of the file ‘%ls’ at offset %#016I64x succeeded after failing %d time(s) with error: %ls. Additional messages in the SQL Server error log and system event log may provide more detail. This error condition threatens database integrity and must be corrected. Complete a full database consistency check (DBCC CHECKDB). This error can be caused by many factors; for more information, see SQL Server Books Online.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 825
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 9.0
Component: SQLEngine
Symbolic Name: B_RETRYWORKED
Message: A read of the file ‘%ls’ at offset %#016I64x succeeded after failing %d time(s) with error: %ls. Additional messages in the SQL Server error log and system event log may provide more detail. This error condition threatens database integrity and must be corrected. Complete a full database consistency check (DBCC CHECKDB). This error can be caused by many factors; for more information, see SQL Server Books Online.
   
Explanation

This message indicates that the read operation had to be reissued at least one time, and indicates a major problem with the disk hardware. This message does not currently indicate a SQL Server problem, but the disk problem could cause data loss or database corruption if it is not resolved. The system event log may contain related events that help to diagnose the problem. For more information about I/O errors, see
Microsoft SQL Server I/O Basics, Chapter 2http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=69370
.

   
User Action

The following actions may help you identify and resolve the underlying problem:

Review the error log and the variable text in this message for clues that explain the problem.

Check your disk system. The problem could be related to the disks, the disk controllers, array cards, or disk drivers.

Contact the disk manufacturer for the latest utilities for checking the status of your disk system.

Contact the disk manufacturer for the latest driver updates.

Related:

Could not find row in sysobjects for object ID %ld in database ‘%.*ls’. Run DBCC CHECKTABLE on sysobjects.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 604
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 8.0
Component: SQL Engine
Message: Could not find row in sysobjects for object ID %ld in database ‘%.*ls’. Run DBCC CHECKTABLE on sysobjects.
   
Explanation
This error occurs when Microsoft SQL Server cannot find a row in the sysobjects table for a needed table. This error signals data consistency issues in the database.
   
User Action
HARDWARE FAILURE

Run hardware diagnostics and correct any problems. Also examine the Microsoft Windows NT system and application logs and the SQL Server error log to see if the error occurred as the result of hardware failure. Fix any hardware related problems.

If you have persistent data inconsistency problems, try to swap out different hardware components to isolate the problem. Check that your system does not have write caching enabled on the disk controller. If you suspect this to be the case, contact your hardware vendor.

Finally, you might find it beneficial to switch to a completely new hardware system, including reformatting the disk drives and reinstalling the operating system.

RESTORE FROM BACKUP

If the problem is not hardware related and a known clean backup is available, restore the database from the backup.

DBCC CHECKDB

If no clean backup is available, execute DBCC CHECKDB without a repair clause to determine the extent of the corruption. DBCC CHECKDB will recommend a repair clause to use. Then, execute DBCC CHECKDB with the appropriate repair clause to repair the corruption.

CAUTION: If you are unsure what effect DBCC CHECKDB with a repair clause has on your data, contact your primary support provider before executing this statement.

If running DBCC CHECKDB with one of the repair clauses does not correct the problem, contact your primary support provider.

Related:

There is insufficient system memory in resource pool ‘%ls’ to run this query.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 701
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 10.0
Component: SQLEngine
Symbolic Name: NOSYSMEM
Message: There is insufficient system memory in resource pool ‘%ls’ to run this query.
   
Explanation

SQL Server has failed to allocate sufficient memory to run the query. This can be caused by a variety of reasons including operating system settings, physical memory availability, or memory limits on the current workload. In most cases, the transaction that failed is not the cause of this error.

Diagnostic queries, such as DBCC statements, may fail because server the does not have sufficient memory.

   
User Action

The following list outlines general steps that will help in troubleshooting memory errors:

  1. Verify whether other applications or services are consuming memory on this server. Reconfigure less critical applications or services to consume less memory.

  2. Start collecting performance monitor counters for SQL Server
    : Buffer Manager
    ,
    SQL Server: Memory Manager
    .

  3. Check the following SQL Server memory configuration parameters:

    • max server memory

    • min server memory

    • awe enabled

    • min memory per query

    Notice unusual settings. Correct them as necessary. Account for increased memory requirements for SQL Server 2008. Default settings are listed in “Setting Server Configuration Options” in SQL Server Books Online.

  4. If you are using Address Windowing Extensions (AWE), verify that the Windows security setting
    Lock pages in memory
    ‘ is enabled.

  5. Observe DBCC MEMORYSTATUS output and the way it changes when you see these error messages.

  6. Check the workload (for example, number of concurrent sessions, currently executing queries).

The following actions may make more memory available to SQL Server:

  • If applications besides SQL Server are consuming resources, try stopping running these applications or consider running them on a separate server. This will remove external memory pressure.

  • If you have configured
    max server memory,
    increase its setting.

Run the following DBCC commands to free several SQL Server memory caches.

  • DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE

  • DBCC FREESESSIONCACHE

  • DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

If the problem continues, you will need to investigate further and possibly reduce workload.

Related: