3 Surprising Video Trends that Should Inform Your L&D Strategy

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Imagine a cattle stampede that continues for five years, and you’ve also pictured how the populace has stampeded from text to video. According to YouTube’s Press page, people watched a lot of YouTube video in 2013. In 2014, they watched three times as much as they did in 2013. In 2015, the numbers tripled again.

The masses aren’t merely watching video. They’re turning to online video as their preferred method of learning, whether the topic is how to do math or how to use a chainsaw. This mass transition to educational videos has dragged corporate Learning and Development departments into the video-production business – and if you’re a corporate L&D pro with no background in video, you’re having to glean knowledge along the way.

Formulating Courseware Strategy on Common Knowledge Is a No-go

What’s the approach to formulating a strategy for video-based courseware effectively?

You hear tidbits on trends and “common knowledge” in the industry such as: “A training video can be only five minutes long,” or “Millennials watch training videos on smartphones, but everyone else watches on PC.”

Is such “common knowledge” really… knowledge? Where’s the data that supports these “facts”?

Folklore deserves healthy skepticism.

To plan and gauge our courseware effectively and optimize our customer’s learning experiences, we need firsthand, well-sourced data about how people actually interact with video.

I get such data from Ooyala, a resource that offers broadcasters and premium content providers (such as Vudu, Sky Sports UK, Star India) management tools that help them monetize video content. Ooyala tracks and analyzes the viewing behavior of more than 120,000 anonymized viewers in more than 100 countries, then publishes their findings quarterly. You can download Ooyala’s Global Video Index free and study it yourself.

Defying conventional wisdom, three surprising findings from Ooyala’s most recent report could help you optimize your Learning & Development efforts.

Video Trend #1: Longform Is In on Smartphone, Tablets and PCs

For three of the last five quarters, the majority of video watched online was longform – industry-speak for running times over 20 minutes.

  • Videos running 2-5 minutes account for only 38% of the time spent watching video on smartphones.
  • On tablets, longform accounts for 75% of all video time watched.
  • On PCs, viewers watch longform content to completion a whopping 71% of the time.
  • Viewers watch longform to completion on tablets 61.3% of the time.
  • Viewers watch longform to completion on phones 56.6% of the time.

The takeaway: While many factors determine how long your viewer sticks with you (to name a few: relevance, production quality, their reason for watching), the latest research directly contradicts the rote “knowledge” that viewers leave after a few minutes. Although the video offerings Ooyala measures mostly consist of entertainment, their data reveals that the majority of viewers will complete a 22-minute video if it’s interesting, regardless of subject material.

Questions to consider: How might using a longer format affect the way you subdivide your content? Can your content hold interest that long? Can you identify topics where learning and retention would benefit from not being shoe-horned into five minutes?

Video Trend #2: Mobile Video Is Mainstream Now

In Q1 of 2018, the number of videos viewed on mobile devices was up all over the world. For example, of all video plays in Asia-Pac, 60.7% occurred on mobile devices. EMEA and Latin America hit all-time highs for mobile’s share of video plays.

Mobile video views also rose to being the majority of views in every age demographic, everywhere.

The takeaway: Common knowledge held that mobile viewership was a niche for the young or for early adopters. Now, the majority of all video views occur on a tablet or phone. If you’re still developing courseware primarily for desktop PCs, you’re offering yesterday’s modality to an audience that’s rapidly leaving it. Consider whether your courseware developers should start thinking, “Mobile first.”

Video Trend #3: Streaming Is Overtaking Conventional TV

Sixty percent of all households that have a broadband Internet connection have at least one Streaming Video On Demand (SVOD) service (think Netflix, Hulu, HBO Now). The most rapidly growing segment is “households with four or more services.”

Content creators are scaling up massively to meet the anticipated need for content on demand. Top content providers processed three times as much content in Q1 2018 as they did in Q1 2017. This trend won’t abate as heavyweights such as Apple and Disney race smaller providers to launch new streaming services in 2019.

The takeaway: Consumer culture drives relentlessly toward “get what you want, when you want it.” In that context, how happy are your customers to wait weeks for your five-day training class to roll around again? Businesses that offer customers video training on demand will probably enjoy a growing advantage over competitors offering conventional courseware.

At Dell EMC Education Services, we are working tirelessly to develop an on-demand video learning platform so customers can choose traditional classes, instant video support, or a combination.  We’ve also begun adding interactivity so that viewers can click on a video table of contents, or click within a video to branch to a more in-depth related video. This is the near-term future of learning.

Summary

In times when what “everyone knows” about learning videos might be unfounded, finding a reliable source of data can improve your predictions and planning. Ooyala is not the only source, but it’s free, well-derived, and gives me a refreshing reality check against what I thought I knew. Check out the report for yourself. When it comes to customer behavior, timely trend-spotting can determine whether your training content lands with a thud or a whoop – and whether your fiscal year ends with an oops or a yay!

Please feel free to comment or share your insights with me below.

The post 3 Surprising Video Trends that Should Inform Your L&D Strategy appeared first on InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services.


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Getting Lost at the Edge

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It’s hard to read any technology blog, research report, announcement or interview without seeing the word “edge.” It’s becoming almost as commonplace as “cloud,” and can be equally confusing. The concept isn’t necessarily new, however. Before the term “edge” caught fire, we had a long history of decentralizing applications and services—Content delivery networks (CDNs), DNS proxies and DDoS systems are all founded on the principle that the laws of large numbers (“too much” or “too many” of anything) require distribution for efficiency. I often see “edge” used in specific contexts, such as: A set of products: “Hey, look at our … READ MORE



ENCLOSURE:https://blog.dellemc.com/uploads/2018/07/the-edge-correct-600×356.jpg

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Weekly news round-up: Ericsson inks IMDb deal & BBC salaries audited

Digital digest index

Ericsson signs global deal with IMDb

IMDb, the popular directory for celebrity, movie and television information, has signed a global distribution deal with Ericsson to integrate IMDb’s metadata into Ericsson’s content discovery ecosystem, which was launched at NAB this year. In a statement released by Ericsson, broadcasters, content owners and service providers will have access to the extensive universe of IMDb data from images, poster art to clips, trailers and cast and crew information.

Star India invests $192 million into digital content

Media company Star India invested $192.04 million into its digital content stream. Reuters reported the intense competition among video streaming providers to break into the Indian OTT market has included bids from global giants Amazon and Netflix. Star India has secured its position as a competitive streaming video provider and is backed by 21st Century Fox invested the money in Novi Digital Entertainment Pvt Ltd that hosts streaming video platforms. A further $2.55 billion bid won Star India the rights to Indian Premier League (IPL) cricket for the next five years.

UK government fulfils stage one of its fibre promise

The UK government announced a £200 million fibre initiative earlier this year. Six months later, and stage one is being rolled out on 3 September. The six pilot schemes will be funded using £10 million with plans to test the innovative ways of connecting offices and public sector buildings with the next generation broadband. Reports suggest the final stages will incorporate a full fibre network running connections straight to customers’ homes or businesses to ensure Britain has a strong digital infrastructure.

BBC audited for gender equality pay

BBC Director General Tony Hall revealed the corporations plan to address gender pay discrepancies. The global corporation published salaries of the highest paid talent in July this year revealing major pay gaps between males and females as well as significantly lower pay for the top 10 stars from black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds. The Guardian shared the BBC will offer transparency going forwards with some stars potentially facing a pay cut.

Blockchain used for VFX in Hollywood

Otoy has released their ambitious plans to use Blockchain, the technology behind the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, in a cloud rendering process for visual effects across virtual reality (VR) and other video content. Variety shared in an exclusive, the company plans to raise $134 million via token sales to start the process of rendering holographic 3D and video effects. The use of optimised chips instead of expensive supercomputers making for a cheaper and quicker implementation with the hopes to be adopted by the movie industry.

Roku files for $100m IPO

Streaming specialist Roku is aiming to raise $100 million after filing for an Initial Public Offering, aiming to be the TV streaming platform connecting the entire TV ecosystem to its growing database and simplified user experience. According to Advanced Television, the company has seen a 62% growth in the last six months through offering a streaming platform to help content publishers connect with their audiences and montetise opportunities.

Putin says AI will rule the world

Russian president Vladimir Putin said in an address whichever nation leads the way with artificial intelligence (AI), he predicted, will be the nation to dominate the future of global affairs. Putin predicted AI to be used to fight cyber warfare and whilst likely to boost economies across medical research, surveillance technology and even to fight future wars.

Future of film and TV secured for Scotland

A further £10 million investment into the film and TV sector has been pledged by the Scottish government. The contribution is part of a wider push to invest in the longevity of screen productions in Scotland. The government has donated a further £3.25 million to incentivise native Scotland productions, as well as a government funded project to establish a National Film and Television School in Glasgow.

Related:

Event ID 352 — Unicast Streaming

Event ID 352 — Unicast Streaming

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Unicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the distribution of content using unicast streaming, the default method by which a Windows Media server delivers content. A unicast stream is a one-to-one connection between the server and a client, which means that each client receives a distinct stream and only those clients that request the stream receive it. It offers the benefits of interactivity between a player and server, easier setup, and multiple-bit-rate (MBR) streaming capability. However, the number of users that are able to receive unicast streams is limited by content bit rate and the speed of the server network. For more information, see Delivering content as a unicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 352
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_NACKS_WARNING
Message: The number of negative acknowledgements (NACKs) received by the Windows Media server exceeded the NACK warning limit. The server received %1 NACK requests in %2 milliseconds.

Resolve
Protect against denial-of-service attacks

Ordinarily, negative acknowledgement (NACK) requests occur when the server or network is overloaded and packets cannot be sent through the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) reliably. Clients must request that packets be resent. This NACK warning limit in Windows Media Services is set so that only a very high number of NACK requests, a condition that indicates a denial-of-service attack, cause this issue.

First, confirm that bandwidth bottleneck issues on the network are not causing the problem. For more information, see Bandwidth. If the network does not appear to be at fault, review the server log files to determine whether clients are instigating a denial-of-service attack by flooding the network with content requests so that the server cannot respond adequately to legitimate client requests for content. If your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, the log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack. For more information about the fields used in Windows Media server log files, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Note: A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, see Capacity planning. To test the capacity of your Windows Media server, you can simulate client requests for unicast streams from the server by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator.

Verify

To verify that the unicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  7. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  8. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Note: To ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, perform network load tests by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator to determine the maximum capacity of your server, and then make the appropriate adjustments to the Limits properties in Windows Media Services that specify the Windows Media server performance boundaries. A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your transmission does not exceed the capabilities of your server, network, or audience, see Capacity planning.

Related Management Information

Unicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 351 — Multicast Streaming

Event ID 351 — Multicast Streaming

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Multicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the multicast distribution of content. Multicast streaming is a one-to-many relationship between a Windows Media server and the clients receiving the stream. With a multicast stream, the server streams to a multicast IP address on the network, and all clients receive the same stream by subscribing to the IP address. Because there is only one stream from the server regardless of the number of clients receiving the stream, a multicast stream requires the same amount of bandwidth as a single unicast stream containing the same content. For more information, see Delivering content as a multicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 351
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_MULTICAST_FORMAT_NOT_FOUND
Message: Stream format information could not be found for the multicast broadcast.

Resolve
Create a new multicast information file

Run the Multicast Announcement Wizard for the broadcast publishing point to create a new multicast information file.

To start the Multicast Announcement Wizard:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, right-click the broadcast publishing point for the multicast content.
  3. In the details pane, click the Announce tab.
  4. In Connect to a multicast stream, click Run Multicast Announcement Wizard.

Note: For information about completing the wizard, see Working with the Multicast Announcement Wizard.

Verify

To verify that the multicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the broadcast publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab.
  5. In the Connect to a multicast stream area, click Run Multicast Announcement Wizard to create a multicast information file (a file with an .nsc file name extension). This file contains information that the Player needs to decode and stream the multicast broadcast. For more information about completing the wizard, see Working with the Multicast Announcement Wizard.
  6. Use the announcement files created by the wizard to access the multicast broadcast in Windows Media Player. For more information, see Testing the announcement file.

Related Management Information

Multicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 350 — Multicast Streaming

Event ID 350 — Multicast Streaming

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Multicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the multicast distribution of content. Multicast streaming is a one-to-many relationship between a Windows Media server and the clients receiving the stream. With a multicast stream, the server streams to a multicast IP address on the network, and all clients receive the same stream by subscribing to the IP address. Because there is only one stream from the server regardless of the number of clients receiving the stream, a multicast stream requires the same amount of bandwidth as a single unicast stream containing the same content. For more information, see Delivering content as a multicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 350
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_MULTICAST_SINK_STOPPED
Message: The multicast broadcast stopped. A socket error occurred.

Resolve
Select a different IP address for multicasting

First, make sure that the local area network (LAN) cable is plugged into the network adapter on the Windows Media server. If the cable is connected, select an alternate IP address from which to multicast.

This procedure requires that you have multiple network interface cards or multiple virtual IP addresses on the Windows Media server.

To select an alternate IP address from which to multicast:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, right-click the broadcast publishing point for the multicast content, and then click Stop.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Multicast streaming.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Multicast Data Writer, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Multicast Data Writer Properties dialog box, click the Advanced tab.
  7. In IP address of the network interface card to multicast from, select an alternate IP address.
  8. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the multicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the broadcast publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab.
  5. In the Connect to a multicast stream area, click Run Multicast Announcement Wizard to create a multicast information file (a file with an .nsc file name extension). This file contains information that the Player needs to decode and stream the multicast broadcast. For more information about completing the wizard, see Working with the Multicast Announcement Wizard.
  6. Use the announcement files created by the wizard to access the multicast broadcast in Windows Media Player. For more information, see Testing the announcement file.

Related Management Information

Multicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 349 — Unicast Streaming

Event ID 349 — Unicast Streaming

Updated: August 14, 2009

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

You can configure Unicast Streaming plug-ins in Windows Media Services to enable the distribution of content using unicast streaming, the default method by which a Windows Media server delivers content. A unicast stream is a one-to-one connection between the server and a client, which means that each client receives a distinct stream and only those clients that request the stream receive it. It offers the benefits of interactivity between a player and server, easier setup, and multiple-bit-rate (MBR) streaming capability. However, the number of users that are able to receive unicast streams is limited by content bit rate and the speed of the server network. For more information, see Delivering content as a unicast stream.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 349
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.6
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_STOP_RECEIVING_NACKS
Message: The number of negative acknowledgements (NACKs) received by the Windows Media server exceeded the NACK warning limit. The server received %1 NACK requests in %2 milliseconds. The server will stop receiving NACK requests for %3 milliseconds so that it can recover.

Resolve
Protect against denial-of-service attacks

Ordinarily, negative acknowledgement (NACK) requests occur when the server or network is overloaded and packets cannot be sent through the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) reliably. Clients must request that packets be resent. This NACK warning limit in Windows Media Services is set so that only a very high number of NACK requests, a condition that indicates a denial-of-service attack, cause this issue.

First, confirm that bandwidth bottleneck issues on the network are not causing the problem. For more information, see Bandwidth. If the network does not appear to be at fault, review the server log files to determine whether clients are instigating a denial-of-service attack by flooding the network with content requests so that the server cannot respond adequately to legitimate client requests for content. If your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, the log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack. For more information about the fields used in Windows Media server log files, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Note: A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, see Capacity planning. To test the capacity of your Windows Media server, you can simulate client requests for unicast streams from the server by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator.

Verify

To verify that the unicast stream can be delivered to clients, test the stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  3. In the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts the stream that you want to test.
  4. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  5. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  6. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  7. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  8. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.

Note: If some members of your expected audience will access the stream from outside your network firewall, your testing scenario should include that condition. For more information about the firewall configuration for Windows Media Services, see Firewall Information for Windows Media Services.

Note: To ensure that your content can reach all your clients without delays or interruptions, perform network load tests by using Microsoft Windows Media Load Simulator to determine the maximum capacity of your server, and then make the appropriate adjustments to the Limits properties in Windows Media Services that specify the Windows Media server performance boundaries. A streaming media network that has been correctly planned and configured will improve response time, data throughput, content availability, and reduce the data error rate. To estimate the server requirements that are necessary to ensure that your transmission does not exceed the capabilities of your server, network, or audience, see Capacity planning.

Related Management Information

Unicast Streaming

Streaming Media Services

Related:

Event ID 345 — Unicast Logging

Event ID 345 — Unicast Logging

Updated: November 17, 2007

Applies To: Windows Server 2008

You can configure Logging plug-ins in Windows Media Services to keep a record, a log file, of client and server activity during a streaming session. Log information can also help:

  • Track server usage so that you can decide when you might need to add more resources to your system.
  • Assist you in planning your security implementation. For example, if your system is subjected to a denial-of-service attack, log files can help you determine which clients are being used in the attack.
  • Identify user-reported issues with your streaming system by providing event codes that correspond to common issues.
  • Provide historical data for use in trend analysis and business cases.

For more information, see Logging Model for Windows Media Services.

Event Details

Product: Windows Media Services
ID: 345
Source: WMServer
Version: 9.5
Symbolic Name: WMS_EVMSG_INVALID_CHARACTER_FOUND_IN_PATH_TEMPLATE
Message: Invalid characters were found in the unicast logging path template. The specified path ‘%1’ was replaced with the new path ‘%2’.

Resolve
Update the unicast logging path template

To configure the path template for unicast logging:

  1. On the Windows Media server, open Windows Media Services. To open Windows Media Services, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Media Services.
  2. In the console tree, click the Windows Media server or the on-demand publishing point for which you want to log data.
  3. In the details pane, click the Properties tab.
  4. In Category, click Logging.
  5. In Plug-in, right-click WMS Client Logging, and then click Properties.
  6. In the WMS Client Logging Properties dialog box, in Directory, enter the path and name for the log file. For more information, see WMS Client Logging.
  7. Click OK to save the changes.

Verify

To verify that the client logs are being created correctly, test a stream by using Windows Media Player:

  1. If you want to test the stream by using Windows Media Player on the computer that is running Windows Media Services, you must install Desktop Experience. For more information, see Installing Desktop Experience.
  2. In Windows Media Services, in the console tree, click the publishing point that hosts a stream that you want to test.
  3. In the details pane, click the Announce tab, and then, in Connect to a unicast stream, note the value of the URL that a client can use to access the content.
  4. Start Windows Media Player on a computer that can access the stream, and enter the URL that you noted in the previous step.
  5. Using the Player controls, test the control functionality of the content stream. Broadcast streams can use the Start and Stop commands. On-demand streams can use the Start, Stop, and Pause commands, and the Seek bar.
  6. Test all the available streaming protocols. A unicast stream will try to connect by using the MMS protocol, but will switch to the RTSP protocol if network conditions or the Player version requires it. The HTTP protocol is not active unless the WMS HTTP Server Control Protocol plug-in is enabled. For more information, see About data transfer protocols.
  7. Allow the stream to play for a representative period of time and check that the stream quality is sufficient for the type of content and the capabilities of the equipment.
  8. View the fields in the log file to confirm that they are filled in correctly. For more information, see Log File Entries Reference.

Note: You can use a Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) value created by Windows Media Player to identify the Player connection to the Windows Media server and view the log entries created by the Player that you use in your test environment. The c-playerid field in the log is used to record the Player ID value. To help protect user privacy, the option to send unique Player identification information to content providers is turned off in Windows Media Player. For Player log entries, if the Player is configured to not send this information, the recorded value in c-playerid is: {3300AD50-2C39-46c0-AE0A-xxxxxxxxxxxx}, where x is the session ID of the client. To identify the log entries generated by the Player in your test environment, you can enable the option to send a unique Player ID on the Privacy tab in Windows Media Player. For more information, see the Windows Media Player Privacy Statement.

Related Management Information

Unicast Logging

Streaming Media Services

Related: