Predictions for Big Data Security in 2016

Leading into 2016, Oracle made ten big data predictions, and one in particular around security. We are nearly four months into the year and we’ve seen these predictions coming to light.

Increase in regulatory protections of personal information

Early February saw the creation of the Federal Privacy Council, “which will bring together the privacy officials from across the Government to help ensure the implementation of more strategic and comprehensive Federal privacy guidelines. Like cyber security, privacy must be effectively and continuously addressed as our nation embraces new technologies, promotes innovation, reaps the benefits of big data and defends against evolving threats.”

The European Union General Data Protection Regulation is a reform of EU’s 1995 data protection rules (Directive 95/46/EC). Their Big Data fact sheet was put forth to help promote the new regulations. “A plethora of market surveys and studies show that the success of providers to develop new services and products using big data is linked to their capacity to build and maintain consumer trust.” As a timeline, the EU expects adoption in Spring 2016 and enforcement will begin two years later in Spring 2018.

Earlier this month, the Federal Communications Commission announced a proposal to restrict Internet providers’ ability to share the information they collect about what their customers do online with advertisers and other third parties.

Increase use of classification systems that categorize data into groups with pre-defined policies for access, redaction and masking.

Infosecurity Magazine article highlights the challenge of data growth and the requirement for classification: “As storage costs dropped, the attention previously shown towards deleting old or unnecessary data has faded. However, unstructured data now makes up 80% of non-tangible assets, and data growth is exploding. IT security teams are now tasked with protecting everything forever, but there is simply too much to protect effectively – especially when some of it is not worth protecting at all.”

The three benefits of classification highlighted include the ability to raise security awareness, prevent data loss, and address records management regulations. All of these are legitimate benefits of data classification that organizations should consider. Case in point, Oracle customer Union Investment increased agility and security by automatically processing investment fund data within their proprietary application, including complex asset classification with up to 500 data fields, which were previously distributed to IT staff using spreadsheets.

Continuous cyber-threats will prompt companies to both tighten security, as well as audit access and use of data.

This is sort of a no-brainer. We know more breaches are coming, such as here, here and here. And we know companies increase security spending after they experience a data breach or witness one close to home. Most organizations now know that completely eliminating the possibility of a data breach is impossible, and therefore, appropriate detective capabilities are more important than ever. We must act as if the bad guys are on our network and then detect their presence and respond accordingly.

See the rest of the Enterprise Big Data Predictions, 2016.

Image Source: http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/worlds-biggest-data-breaches-hacks/

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