Understanding single sign-on (SSO) between IBM Lotus Domino and IBM WebSphere Portal

This white paper provides an in-depth explanation of how the single
sign-on (SSO) feature works between IBM Lotus Domino and IBM WebSphere Portal.
Learn the basics of how cookies are written to―and used in―Internet browsers,
how the cookies are used to enable SSO, and exactly what is in the token and
why it’s needed for SSO between two servers. Included are specific details of
where the WebSphere Portal and Lotus Domino servers configure each part of the
cookie used for SSO, the LTPAToken. Editor’s Note: This white paper is the
first in a three-part series on SSO to be published over the next few months.
See the second paper, “Configuring single sign-on (SSO) between IBM WebSphere
Portal and IBM Lotus Domino.”

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Monitoring Tivoli Access Manager WebSEAL server transactions using Tivoli Composite Application Manager for Response Time Tracking

IBM Tivoli Monitoring software is used to monitor the availability and performance of your enterprise servers on a variety of platforms.
IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for Response time tracking is used for measuring the response time of transactions. This article shows how Tivoli Monitoring, in conjunction with Tivoli Composite Application Manager, can be used to monitor response time of the WebSEAL server.

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WebSphere Process Server and Lotus Forms integration

A new capability in WebSphere Process Server V6.1 includes the ability to work with Lotus Forms as a front-end for human tasks. This article describes how the two technologies work together and shows you how to build a business process with human tasks that include Lotus Forms.

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The busy Java developer’s guide to db4o: Transactions, distribution, and security

Java developers can get a lot of mileage out of storing
objects directly in an object-oriented database like db4o. Without support for
transactions or the ability to use data in a distributed environment (and keep
it secure), however, you probably won’t have much use for the OODBMS. In this
final installment in The busy Java developer’s guide to db4o, Ted
Neward shows you how db4o handles three concerns central to Java enterprise
development: transactions, distributed data management, and Web application
security.

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ASP.NET Authentication using LTPA and Tivoli Federated Identity Manager (TFIM)

In this article, we show you how to enable your ASP.NET applications for federated single sign-on utilizing the IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager (TFIM) 6.1.1.1 to translate LTPA cookies set by IBM WebSphere Application Server. We show how to create an ASP.NET HTTP module that extracts the LTPA cookie then uses TFIM to translate the token into a username via WS-Trust.Background

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Using and understanding Reader Names fields in IBM Lotus Notes and Domino

Take advantage of and implement the extremely useful IBM Lotus Notes and Domino security feature, Reader Names fields. Learn how this feature affects replication, agents, and views and how to troubleshoot two common problems with Reader Names fields.

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DB2 UDB, WebSphere, and iBATIS

Learn how to use iBATIS in Java applications and J2EE applications. This article covers the iBATIS syntax, accessing data sources, setting up WebSphere Studio projects to support iBATIS, and querying DB2 using iBATIS.

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Using Notes/Domino SMTP with a DMZ

We conclude our two-part article series about setting up a DMZ to help protect your company’s resources with a look at several different scenarios for hosting Domino servers in the DMZ to control inbound and outbound SMTP mail traffic.

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SSL client authentication: It’s a matter of trust

This article introduces client authentication with SSL (Secure Sockets Layer, a security protocol), discusses its benefits and explains how to set up SSL client authentication on a Domino 4.6 or 4.6.1 server.

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