A user hit their quota limit on volume %2.

Details
Product: Windows Operating System
Event ID: 37
Source: ntfs
Version: 5.0
Symbolic Name: IO_FILE_QUOTA_LIMIT
Message: A user hit their quota limit on volume %2.
   
Explanation

The administrator-configured quota limit for a specific user was reached. The user can no longer save new data to the disk until files are deleted to create more space or the administrator changes the quota limit.

   
User Action

Delete any unnecessary files.

Related:

The system failed to flush data to the transaction log. Corruption may occur.

Details
Product: Windows Operating System
Event ID: 57
Source: ftdisk
Version: 5.2
Symbolic Name: IO_WARNING_LOG_FLUSH_FAILED
Message: The system failed to flush data to the transaction log. Corruption may occur.
   
Explanation

NTFS could not write data to the transaction log. This could affect the ability of NTFS to stop or roll back the operations for which the transaction data could not be written. NTFS could not write data because of one or more of the following reasons:

  1. I/O requests issued by the file system to the disk subsystem might not have been completed successfully.
   
User Action

If this message appears frequently, run Chkdsk to repair the file system.

To repair the file system

  1. Save any unsaved data and close any open programs.
  2. Restart the computer.
    The volume is automatically checked and repaired when you restart the computer.

Alternatively, you can run the Chckdsk tool from the command prompt without shutting down the computer first.

  1. Click Start, click Run, and then type
    cmd
  2. At the command prompt, type
    chkdsk /R /X Drive:
    Chkdsk runs and automatically repairs the volume.
  3. Repeat step 2 for each volume on the disk.

If the following message appears, type Y.

“Cannot lock current drive. Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts?”

The next time the computer is started, Chkdsk will automatically run.

Related:

%1 (%2) %3Unable to read the header of logfile %4. Error %5.

Details
Product: Exchange
Event ID: 412
Source: ESE
Version: 8.0
Symbolic Name: LOG_HEADER_READ_ERROR_ID
Message: %1 (%2) %3Unable to read the header of logfile %4. Error %5.
   
Explanation

This Warning event indicates that the database engine is unable to read the log file header specified in the event description. This may be because of a mismatching log signature, a corrupted log file, or a corrupted log header.

The cause depends on the ESE error code in the Description section of the event. The most common causes are in the following list.

  • Error 530 = Jet_errBadLogSignature = Bad signature for a log file. A signature for log files is used only to make sure that we are replaying the “right” set of log files. For example, if Log 45 from another storage group ended up in the set of log files of another storage group, then ESE will detect a signature mismatch and not replay this log file. A part of each database header includes the signature of the current log file generation; if they do not match, then we error out indicating a mismatch.

  • Error 501 = Jet_errLog fileCorrupt = Log file corrupt. Error 1022 is returned from corrupting the header of a log file. Corrupting other areas of the log file returns 501 Jet_errLog fileCorrupt errors.

  • Error 1022 = Jet_errDiskIO = disk I/O error. The 1022 error is a generic error that appears whenever a disk I/O problem prevents Exchange from gaining access to a requested page in the database or to a transaction log. The most common reason for a 1022 error is a database file that was severely damaged or truncated. If this issue occurs, Exchange requests a page number that is larger than the number of pages in the database file, and a 1022 error results. This issue can occur because of issues in the file system or because of incorrect transaction log replay. In a log file, error 1022 is returned from corrupting the header of a log file.

   
User Action

To resolve the warning, use one of the following procedures:

  • Restore data from online backup.

  • If there is no valid backup, repair the database by running the Eseutil /p command, and then run the isinteg -fix command on the affected store repeatedly until you receive 0 fixes or the same result for fixes two times. After you repair the database by using the Eseutil /p command and isinteg -fix, the database may not be stable and reliable. Because the repair process deletes database pages, data loss is likely. If you have to run a hard repair on your production database, we recommend that you move the data out of the repaired database to a new database or rebuild the database using the Move Mailbox command.

For information about ESE error codes other than the ones explained in this topic, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base articles:

For more information about ESE error 1022, see 314917, Understanding and Analyzing -1018, -1019, and -1022 Exchange database errors.

If you are not already doing so, consider running the tools that Microsoft Exchange offers to help administrators analyze and troubleshoot their Exchange environment. These tools can help you make sure that your configuration is in line with Microsoft best practices. They can also help you identify and resolve performance issues, improve mail flow, and better manage disaster recovery scenarios. Go to the Toolbox node of the Exchange Management Console to run these tools now. For more information about these tools, see Toolbox in the Exchange Server 2007 Help.

Related:

NTFS – File system corrupt

Details
Product: Windows Operating System
Event ID: 55
Source: ntfs
Version: 5.2.3790.1830
Message: NTFS – File system corrupt
   
Explanation

The file system on the volume might be corrupt due to one or more of the following reasons:

  • The disk might have bad sectors.
  • I/O requests issued by the file system to the disk subsystem might not have been completed successfully.

Cause

  • The disk might have bad sectors.
  • I/O requests issued by the file system to the disk subsystem might not have been completed successfully.
   
User Action

Check the state of the file system and repair it if necessary.

To check the state of the file system

  1. At a command prompt, type chkntfs <drive letter>:
  2. Check the message from chkntfs.
  • If chkntfs displays the message “<drive letter>: is dirty”, the volume is corrupt. In this case, repair the file system using the chkdsk /r command.
  • If chkntfs displays the message “<drive letter>: is not dirty”, the volume is not corrupt and no further action is required.

To repair the file system

  1. Save any unsaved data, close any open programs, and restart the computer.
  2. Microsoft® Windows® automatically runs chkdsk /r on “dirty” (corrupt) volumes to check and repair them.

You can also run chkdsk manually using the following steps.

  • At a command prompt, type chkdsk /x <drive letter>:Chkdsk runs and automatically repairs the volume.
  • If chkdsk displays the following message, type Y. “Cannot lock current drive. Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts?”Windows will automatically run chkdsk the next time the computer is started.

If you regularly see NTFS Event ID 41 or Event ID 55 in Event Viewer, run chkdsk using the /r option. This option allows chkdsk to locate bad sectors on the hard disk.

Related Resources

For more information about the chkdsk /c and /i options, see Knowledge Base article 187941 “An Explanation of CHKDSK and the New /C and /I Switches” at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=25770.

For more information about NTFS recoverability, see Knowledge Base article 101670 “Transaction Log Supports NTFS Recoverability,” at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=25981.

Related: