ScaleIO: Incorrect information in “scli –query_sds_device_info” command output

Article Number: 495101 Article Version: 5 Article Type: Break Fix



ScaleIO 2.0.1.2

Issue Description

In some cases, “scli –query_sds_device_info” can return incorrect disk data – like disk size, temperature etc.

Scenario

Issue can be experienced when Hardware Awareness commands (i.e. “–query_sds_device_info”) are used against HP RAID controllers.

Symptoms

Various disk information, like size, temperature, status etc. can be returned incorrectly.

Impact

Unable to properly monitor SDS devices on hardware level from ScaleIO perspective.

There is a bug in ScaleIO software which causes wrong disk information to be returned.

Workaround

There is no workaround.

Impacted versions

2.0.1

2.0.1.2

Fixed in version

2.0.1.3

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Good morning,

In the company where I work, a disk formatting of the VNX5100 was made, but they also eliminated the operating system of the VNX (OE)

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I had thought of a re-image, but does this work?



Thanks for your answers!!!

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Unable to publish image, out of disk space, ELM console reports “No free mft record for $MFT: No space left on device”

First, try just expanding the image template. It’s entirely possible that the sheer size of the layers you have assigned is larger than the allotted space you have set in the Image Template.

However, if you are sure the Image Template is big enough, this might be a problem we sometimes have handling the NTFS Master File Table ($MFT), which sometimes causes the $MFT to run out of space. The $MFT is where NTFS stores file informatin, including the cluster maps, file attributes, and other meta-data. If a file is small enough, its entire contents can be stored in the $MFT instead if allocating cluster space for it. The $MFT should always dynamically resize, but sometimes it does not, leading to a spurious out-of-space issue.

However, we have found that regenerating the $MFT can help. Normally, when publishing, the OS Layer is much smaller than the published image. That allows us to clone the NTFS filesystem of the OS layer, expand it, and play in the remaining layers. Cloning the fliesystem copies the $MFT from the OS layer, including any odd issues that might be there.

But we cannot shrink a filesystem, so if ever the OS layer is actually larger than the published image, we can’t clone the NTFS filesystem and shrink it. We have to create a new, smaller disk, and copy the OS layer in the sam as we do all other layers. This allows the $MFT to be completely reconstructed. Reconstructing the $MFT during publishing in this way appears to workaround the $MFT problems we sometimes see.

To use this workaround, you need to make sure your OS layer is larger than the Image Template size. By default, OS layers are 60GB virtual disks, and templates are 100GB. If the number and size of the layers in your template is small, you could simply reduce the Image Template size to below 60GB. Otherwise, you can Add Version to your OS layer, and in the Add Version wizard, set the new OS version to be larger than the Image Template. After the Packaging Machine boots, Shutdown for Finalize, Finalize, and assign that new, larger version to your Image Template.

Since layer disks are thin provisioned inside the ELM (because they are VHD files), a 120GB disk that contains 20GB of files is exactly the same size as a 60GB disk that contains 20GB of files. So you can expand the OS layer to be whatever you need it to be, even as you reduce the Image Template as well. However, note that the larger OS layer disks may consume additional space in the Connector Cache.

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How to change the disk deletion interval to delete unused base disks on the VM storage

Background :

DiskReaper_retryInterval – This defines how often each disk is checked, format is hh:mm:ss.ff, where the seconds (ss) and fractions (ff) are optional. Default is 6 hours.

DiskReaper_heartbeatInterval – This defines how often the check process runs to see if there is any pending work, in the same format, this will be constrained to be at most 1/5 of the retry interval so that there are at least 5 checks performed within the larger time space (it also cannot be 0). Default is 1 hour.

The basic behaviour (with the default time) is that a background process runs every hour and checks if there are any disks that haven’t been checked for more than 6 hours. If there are then those disks are checked to see if it is safe to remove them (i.e. all VMs that were previously using the disk have now been updated to use a newer disk). If there are no VMs remaining for a given disk it will be deleted.

If we want the system to check more often we can set the heartbeat lower and if we want the disks to disappear faster after the last machine then reduce the retry.

Procedure :

  1. Open the powershell in administrator mode on the delivery controller
  2. Load Citrix snap-ins by running command – asnp citrix*
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Hello Akarsh,

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Performance comparison for those interested (still on DECN community site):

Accelerating your Journey to the data lake with DobiMiner from Datadobi

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Chris Klosterman

Principal Pre-Sales Consultant, Datadobi

chris.klosterman@datadobi.com

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Re: EMC VNXe SP stuck in Service Mode

I have been have an issue reconfiguring an EMC VNXe 3150. Currently, I have managed to get to the point where I can now access EMC Unisphere (Service Mode) but the single Storage Processor is unable to exit Service Mode.

Storage Processor: SPA (Primary)

Status: There is a problem with the system software on this Storage Process (SP).

Recommended Action: Reimage this SP to attempt to correct the system software problem.

I attempted the Reimage to recover the SP software configuration via Unisphere and via SSH but that didn’t work.

service@spa spa:~> svc_reimage -r

###############################################################################

WARNING: This action will reimage the SSD and rebuild it from the Backend!!

###############################################################################

Enter “yes” if want to proceed with this action: yes

Clearing boot counters…

Resetting boot control data to initial defaults…

Clearing bootflash boot block

Rescue Mode

100+0 records in

100+0 records out

51200 bytes (51 kB) copied, 0.00728396 s, 7.0 MB/s

Setting reimage reboot reason thru peer…

ssh: connect to host peer port 22: No route to host

*** WARNING *** This Storage Processor is in Service Mode *** WARNING ***

*** Run “svc_diag –state=basic” to view more system state information ***

When I try to reinitialize the storage unit via SSH, it fails with the errors below.

service@spa spa:~> svc_reinit

###############################################################################

WARNING: This action will reimage the system and set it to a factory state!!

All data and all settings will be erased!!

###############################################################################

Enter “yes” if want to proceed with this action: yes

Checking if both SPs are in Service mode…

Rescue Mode

Reiniting Backend…

Creating device for disk <0> starting at sector <0x0>

Zeroing out sector <0x1000> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.0147188 s, 34.8 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x1400> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.001892 s, 271 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x291a0a8> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.00788508 s, 64.9 kB/s

Creating device for disk <1> starting at sector <0x0>

Zeroing out sector <0x1000> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.0142442 s, 35.9 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x1400> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.0015092 s, 339 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x291a0a8> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.00779338 s, 65.7 kB/s

Creating device for disk <2> starting at sector <0x0>

Zeroing out sector <0x1000> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.0134204 s, 38.2 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x1400> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.00280937 s, 182 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x291a0a8> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.00777899 s, 65.8 kB/s

Creating device for disk <3> starting at sector <0x0>

Zeroing out sector <0x1000> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.0141424 s, 36.2 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x1400> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.00309453 s, 165 kB/s

Zeroing out sector <0x291a0a8> on asidc device

1+0 records in

1+0 records out

512 bytes (512 B) copied, 0.00730093 s, 70.1 kB/s

Clearing Local NVRAM…

Clearing Local memory persistency

Clearing Local boot control data

Recreating local service partition

umount: /dev/mirrora4: not found

mke2fs 1.41.1 (01-Sep-2008)

Could not stat /dev/mirrora4 — No such file or directory

The device apparently does not exist; did you specify it correctly?

ERROR: Failed to recreate local service partition!

*** WARNING *** This Storage Processor is in Service Mode *** WARNING ***

*** Run “svc_diag –state=basic” to view more system state information ***

I have tried everything I could think of and all the “fixes” I could find online but it always returns to the Service Mode warning.

*** WARNING *** This Storage Processor is in Service Mode *** WARNING ***

*** Run “svc_diag –state=basic” to view more system state information ***

I also tried exiting Service Mode manually via SSH, still not working.

service@spa spa:~> svc_rescue_state -c

Resetting boot control data to initial defaults…

*** WARNING *** This Storage Processor is in Service Mode *** WARNING ***

*** Run “svc_diag –state=basic” to view more system state information ***

Any ideas?

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