Nutanix AFS (Nutanix Files) might not function properly with the ELM

This information is very preliminary and has not been rigorously tested.

AFS appears to use DFS namespace redirection to point you to individual nodes in the AFS cluster where your data is actually held. The ELM does not support DFS redirection, so when the STATUS_PATH_NOT_COVERED comes back from the initial node we reached, we fail the attempt instead of moving to the requested server. If randomly you happen to connect to the node where your data is, there is no redirection and no error.

Unfortunately, there does not appear to be a workaround except to point the ELM to a specific node in the AFS cluster instead of the main cluster address. This node probably has to be the AFS “leader” node.

Related:

Re: Unity-based file replication with DFS

You’re understanding it correctly. With Isilon you could move the name over (manually), and then the DFS clients would be fine, but there’s little need when an application like Superna Eyeglass for Isilon can take care of that for you. With Unity, the whole NAS server, including the filesystems, shares, exports, etc. all get replicated to the other side, so yes you have to initiate failover from the Unity array itself (source or target), however then no changes are necessary in DFS, you just let it keep pointing at the one name. And yes if you can’t span the VLAN to the other side, you’ll have to override the IP on the target side. When you failover, the target Unity will dynamically re-register itself in DNS, and the AD machine account moves over too, which is awesome. No need to mess with DFS, just let the leafs point at one location. If you’re unsure of what the customer experience looks like during a failover event, or how long it takes, or what the actions necessary are, I’d suggest creating another test NAS server with just 1 small filesystem on your production NAS, point DFS at it, toss some garbage data in it, and then fail it over. Write yourself a little run-book on the procedure too with screenshots if you’re feeling ambitious.

~Chris Klosterman

chris.klosterman@datadobi.com

Related:

Re: Isilon 8.1 and Microsoft DFS

You want to point the DFS leaf at the cluster using \<isilon_static_smartconnect_zone_name.fqdn><sharename>.

So here is an example in my demo lab:

Step 1. Create the Namespace (as Domain based):

dfs_namespace_wizard.jpg

Step 2. On your Isilon cluster, create the share:

create_the_share.jpg

Step 3. Set the NTFS and Share Permissions appropriately, I won’t delve into how to do that for this response. Also put a few sample files in the directory, just so you can be sure it’s working:

set share perms create data.jpg

Step 4. Create a new Folder in DFS, aka a Leaf:

create_new_leaf.jpg

Yes if you hit browse at this point you will get an error in newer versions of Windows Server (:

error_browsing.jpg

Step 5. Ignore it, and just type in the name of the share that you know you created:

fullpath.jpg

Step 6. Click OK a few times. To quote Emeril, Bam! done.

dfs_leaf_done.jpg

Step 7. Browse to the UNC path, in my case as the domain admin, because I used run-as-root permissions and didn’t bother setting up proper ACLs, or real data, because it’s a lab.

view_the_leaf.jpg

Step 8. Ensure that the data you created or that was already there is visible:

data_presence.jpg

So; TLDR; Ignore the error and just type in the full path and hit OK. Or you can use powershell to create the DFS leaf without messing with a non-working browse button that expects the target to be a Microsoft Windows server. There are plenty of threads on TechNet about this issue, but not worth your time to be honest.

Hope this helps, if it solves your issue, please mark it as solved/resolved.

~Chris Klosterman

Principal SE, Datadobi

chris.klosterman@datadobi.com

Related:

Isilon 8.1 and Microsoft DFS

You want to point the DFS leaf at the cluster using \<isilon_static_smartconnect_zone_name.fqdn><sharename>.

So here is an example in my demo lab:

Step 1. Create the Namespace (as Domain based):

dfs_namespace_wizard.jpg

Step 2. On your Isilon cluster, create the share:

create_the_share.jpg

Step 3. Set the NTFS and Share Permissions appropriately, I won’t delve into how to do that for this response. Also put a few sample files in the directory, just so you can be sure it’s working:

set share perms create data.jpg

Step 4. Create a new Folder in DFS, aka a Leaf:

create_new_leaf.jpg

Yes if you hit browse at this point you will get an error in newer versions of Windows Server (:

error_browsing.jpg

Step 5. Ignore it, and just type in the name of the share that you know you created:

fullpath.jpg

Step 6. Click OK a few times. To quote Emeril, Bam! done.

dfs_leaf_done.jpg

Step 7. Browse to the UNC path, in my case as the domain admin, because I used run-as-root permissions and didn’t bother setting up proper ACLs, or real data, because it’s a lab.

view_the_leaf.jpg

Step 8. Ensure that the data you created or that was already there is visible:

data_presence.jpg

So; TLDR; Ignore the error and just type in the full path and hit OK. Or you can use powershell to create the DFS leaf without messing with a non-working browse button that expects the target to be a Microsoft Windows server. There are plenty of threads on TechNet about this issue, but not worth your time to be honest.

Hope this helps, if it solves your issue, please mark it as solved/resolved.

~Chris Klosterman

Principal SE, Datadobi

chris.klosterman@datadobi.com

Related:

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Related:

Re: DFS Replication as Migration Method

DFSr isn’t supported on Isilon, VNX, Unity, etc. It’s not at all a DNS issue, instead it’s an issue of the service(DFSr) only being supported on Windows Servers. If your data is behind a DFS leaf today you can certainly copy it to a share on Isilon, and then during a switchover event, update the DFS leaf to point from the old source to the new target. How you go about copying the data to the Isilon cluster is where you’ll need to use a host-based tool.

My company, Datadobi makes what I certainly believe is the best host-based migration software on the market, but of course I’m biased. But take a look for yourself if you’d like.

~Chris Klosterman

Principal SE, Datadobi

chris.klosterman@datadobi.com

Enterprise NAS Data Migration and Replication Solutions | Datadobi

Related:

DFS Replication as Migration Method

I’ve seen several old posts about DFS Replication and the Isilon but I’m not sure if what I want to do is what is being described. It’s been some time since I’ve worked with DFS. The theme I see most is that DFS replication isn’t supported by the Isilon, nor by any non-Windows system, but I’ve seen this work with an NS20 (long time ago) but I wasn’t the main admin.

The idea is to take some current shares on another file server and replicate them to new shares on the Isilon using DFS. We’ve done this in the past with other storage appliances, and were successful. Some of our techs prefer this method as they find it non-disruptive. Adding a folder target is no problem, but when we go set up replication, we have to pick a computer object in AD. We find our object for the Isilon (was created when I set up the AD authentication provider, has all correct SPN records) but selecting it results in an error about not being able to resolve.

Is this strictly a DNS issue where I request some sort of alias or other record from the AD record name to my SmartConnect zone alias, if that is even possible? Or is there something deeper to DFS replication that means it truly won’t work even if it could resolve?

If a DNS issue alone, what do I request? Something pointing to the SIP? Something pointing to my delegated zone for the Isilon?

Related:

7022388: Unable to access files when using NSS for AD Net Folders behind DFS junctions

This document (7022388) is provided subject to the disclaimer at the end of this document.

Environment

Micro Focus Filr 3.2

Situation

Active Directory provisioned users in Filr are unable to access files within a Net Folder of type OES (NSS for AD) where a folder is behind a DFS junction. The same files are accessible to eDirectory provisioned users in Filr. When this issue is observed, the following error is logged in the /var/opt/novell/filr/log/famtd.log file:

Sep 22 11:43:38 filr1 famtd[18310]: ERROR:FAMT_ReadxmlMemory: Document not parsed successfully

Sep 22 11:43:38 filr1 famtd[18310]: ERROR:NetFolder::loadXML: failed to load xml buffer, error 1

Sep 22 11:43:38 filr1 famtd[18310]: ERROR:TrusteeCacheOperations::buildTrusteeCache: Failed to load trustee file into an xml buffer

Resolution

A fix for this issue is available in Filr 3.3 Update.

Cause

The NSS Trustee file for volume (VOL1.TrusteeInfo.xml) was of size 1MB (only) and XML was not complete. Where as the NCP Trustee file for the corresponding volume (*trustee_data.xml) was of a greater size (such as 1.9 MB). Filr’s FAMTD read only 1MB of the trustee file and therefore led to the XML parsing error.

Disclaimer

This Support Knowledgebase provides a valuable tool for NetIQ/Novell/SUSE customers and parties interested in our products and solutions to acquire information, ideas and learn from one another. Materials are provided for informational, personal or non-commercial use within your organization and are presented “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND.

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