Event ID 833 — RD Connection Broker Availability

Event ID 833 — RD Connection Broker Availability

Published: January 8, 2010

Applies To: Windows Server 2008 R2

The RD Connection Broker must be available to accept connection requests from user sessions, RD Session Host servers in a farm, and RD Session Host servers running in redirection mode.

Event Details

Product: Windows Operating System
ID: 833
Source: Microsoft-Windows-TerminalServices-SessionBroker
Version: 6.1
Symbolic Name: EVENT_PLUGIN_LOAD_FAILED
Message: The %1 plugin failed to load. HRESULT = %2.

Resolve
Ensure that the plug-in is configured correctly

Resource and filter plug-ins are stored in the Windows registry. Resource plug-ins are stored in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tssdis\Parameters\Resource and filter plug-ins are stored in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tssdis\Parameters\Filter.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To ensure that the plug-in is configured correctly:

  1. On the RD Connection Broker server, open Registry Editor. To open Registry Editor, click Start, click Run, type regedit.exe and then press ENTER.
  2. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tssdis\Parameters\Plugins.
  3. For filter plug-ins, click Filter. For resource plug-ins, click Resource.
  4. Click the plug-in name.
  5. Double-click IsEnabled.
  6. In the Value data box, type 1 and then click OK.
  7. Ensure that the Name, Provider, and CLSID registry settings exist and have values assigned to them.
  8. Close Registry Editor.

Note: If you are unsure which plug-in is not configured correctly, a resource plug-in that is not configured correctly will return an Hresult of 0x88130010, and a filter plug-in that is not configured correctly will return an Hresult of 0x88130011.

Verify

To verify that the RD Connection Broker server is available, ensure that the Remote Desktop Connection Broker service is running.

To perform this procedure, you must have membership in the local Administrators group, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority.

To check that the Remote Desktop Connection Broker service is running:

  1. On the RD Connection Broker server, open the Services snap-in. To open the Services snap-in, click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Services.
  2. If the User Account Control dialog box appears, confirm that the action it displays is what you want, and then click Yes.
  3. In the Services pane, locate the service named Remote Desktop Connection Broker.
  4. Confirm that the Status column for the Remote Destktop Connection Broker service displays Started.

Related Management Information

RD Connection Broker Availability

Remote Desktop Services

Related:

SQL Server has encountered %d occurrence(s) of I/O requests taking longer than %d seconds to complete on file [%ls] in database [%ls] (%d).  The OS file handle is 0x%p.  The offset of the latest long I/O is: %#016I64x.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 833
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 10.0
Component: SQLEngine
Symbolic Name: BUF_LONG_IO
Message: SQL Server has encountered %d occurrence(s) of I/O requests taking longer than %d seconds to complete on file [%ls] in database [%ls] (%d).  The OS file handle is 0x%p.  The offset of the latest long I/O is: %#016I64x.
   
Explanation

This message indicates that SQL Server has issued a read or write request from disk, and that the request has taken longer than 15 seconds to return. This error is reported by SQL Server and indicates a problem with the IO subsystem.

Possible Causes

This problem can be caused system performance issues, hardware errors, firmware errors, device driver problems, or filter driver intervention in the IO process.

   
User Action

Troubleshoot this error by examining the system event log for hardware-related error messages. Also, examine hardware-specific logs if they are available.

Use Performance Monitor to examine the following counters:

  • Average Disk Sec/Transfer

  • Average Disk Queue Length

  • Current Disk Queue Length

For example, the
Average Disk Sec/Transfer
time on a computer that is running SQL Server is typically less than 15 milliseconds. If the
Average Disk Sec/Transfer
value increases, this indicates that the I/O subsystem is not optimally keeping up with the I/O demand.

Note:

Disk access can be slowed by an antivirus program. To increase access speed, exclude the SQL Server data files that are specified in the error message from active virus scans.

For more information about I/O errors, see
Microsoft SQL Server I/O Basics, Chapter 2http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=69370
and the Knowledge Base article at
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/897284/en-ushttp://support.microsoft.com/kb/897284/en-us
.

Related:

SQL Server has encountered %d occurrence(s) of I/O requests taking longer than %d seconds to complete on file [%ls] in database [%ls] (%d). The OS file handle is 0x%p. The offset of the latest long I/O is: %#016I64x.

Details
Product: SQL Server
Event ID: 833
Source: MSSQLServer
Version: 9.00.1399.60
Symbolic Name: BUF_LONG_IO
Message: SQL Server has encountered %d occurrence(s) of I/O requests taking longer than %d seconds to complete on file [%ls] in database [%ls] (%d). The OS file handle is 0x%p. The offset of the latest long I/O is: %#016I64x.
   
Explanation

This message indicates that SQL Server has issued a read or write request from disk, and that the request has taken longer than 15 seconds to return. This error is reported by SQL Server and indicates a problem with the IO subsystem. This error can occur in SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server 2005.

Possible Causes

This problem can be caused system performance issues, hardware errors, firmware errors, device driver problems, or filter driver intervention in the IO process.

   
User Action

Troubleshoot this error by examining the system event log for hardware-related error messages. Also, examine hardware-specific logs if they are available.

  • Use Performance Monitor to examine the following counters:
    • Average Disk Sec/Transfer

    • Average Disk Queue Length

    • Current Disk Queue Length

    For example, the Average Disk Sec/Transfer time on a computer that is running SQL Server is typically less than 15 milliseconds. If the Average Disk Sec/Transfer value increases, this indicates that the I/O subsystem is not optimally keeping up with the I/O demand.

    Note: Disk access can be slowed by an antivirus program. To increase access speed, exclude the SQL Server data files that are specified in the error message from active virus scans.

    For more information, see the Knowledge Base article at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/897284/en-us.

    Related: