ShareFile Data Migration Tool – Data Only

Transfer Type – Data Only

Option used to migrate only data from source to ShareFile.

User-added image

  • Select directory to transfer : Use the browse button to select the source folder that you wish to migrate to ShareFile.
  • Choose destination : Select the upload destination folder within your ShareFile account.
  • Configure transfer options :
    • Schedule Transfer – Allows you to schedule the migration in specific time frame. Enable the option and select the scheduler.
    • Create a root folder to contain the transferred folders -This will create a folder on the root level and migrate all folders from this transfer inside of it
    • Don’t upload files with more recent modified time on ShareFile – Enabling this option would not upload files when most recent file is present in destination folder selected in ShareFile.

Once all option are selected and clicked on Continue button, you will be provided with Pre Migration view

User-added image

Pre-Migration View

1) Migration type – Specifies the type of transfer selected by the Admin

2) Source – Specifies the location from where the data is being migrated

3) Destination – Specifies the location to which the data is being migrated to

4) Total number of files – Count of files being migrated

5) Total Size – Total size being migrated

6) Expected Time – Approx. time that would be taken for the migration

7) File Types Excluded – Displays list of file type
s excluded. “Exclude” link provided to exclude any files from migration. Below view would be presented when clicked on same.

  • User can unselect the file types which needs to be excluded as part of migration.
  • Once un-checked the file types to be excluded , Click on Next Button.

If “Limit Transfer to certain file types” option is enabled – Below screen would be displayed.

User-added image

8) Items Unable to Transfer – Displayed files/folders which are inaccessible and would not be migrated. If there are any files /folders which are inaccessible then link to Review the same would be provided. Below view would be provided clicking on same.

User-added image

Files and Folders would be inaccessible if the user who is currently logged in does not have required permissions or if files are being currently used by other applications. Resolve the permission issue or close any application using the files and proceed with migration.

Note – Files/Folders which are inaccessible would not be migrated. You can still click on Transfer Files to proceed with the migration even when there are inaccessible files/folders.

.

Related:

How to exclude file types in ShareFile Sync for Windows

ShareFile automatically prevents the following file types from being synced: .pst , .jit_temp, .tmp, and various file extensions related to ransomware.

To add or remove a file type on the exclusion list, navigate to Program FilesCitrixShareFileSyncShareFileSync.exe.config and edit the file with Notepad.

User-added image

Related:

ShareFile Search Fails

Metadata indexer will be updated in future release to ignore case of file extension.

Current workaround would be to re-upload files after updating file extension to lower case.

Command syntax example:

ren *.DOC *.doc

Same with any other relevant file types.

Limitations

Currently, files greater than 20 MB are not indexed for Full Text Search, and will not appear in search results.

This feature is not available for files stored in an on-prem StorageZone.

Related:

Sophos Anti-Virus for Linux /UNIX: Running and Configuring on-demand scans

Overview

This article describes the steps to configure on-demand scans on Sophos anti-virus for UNIX. An on-demand scan is a scan that you initiate. You can scan anything from a single file to everything on your computer that you have permission to read. You can either manually run an on-demand scan or schedule it to run unattended.

The command that you type to run an on-demand scan is savscan.

The following sections are covered:

Applies to the following Sophos products and versions

Sophos Anti-Virus for Unix

Run an on-demand scan of the computer

  • To run an on-demand scan of the computer, type:

savscan /

Scan a particular directory or file

  • To scan a particular directory or file, specify the path of the item. For example, type:

savscan /usr/mydirectory/myfile

You can type more than one directory or file in the same command.

Scan a filesystem

  • To scan a filesystem, specify its name. For example, type:

savscan /home

You can type more than one filesystem in the same command.

In this section, where path appears in a command, it refers to the path to be scanned.

  • To see a full list of the options that you can use with an on-demand scan, type:

man savscan

Scan all file types

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus scans only executables. To see a full list of the file types that Sophos

Anti-Virus scans by default, type savscan -vv.

  • To scan all file types, not just those that are scanned by default, use the option -all. Type:

savscan path -all

Note:This makes scanning take longer, can compromise performance on servers, and can cause

false virus reports

Scan a particular directory or file

  • To scan a particular directory or file, specify the path of the item. For example, type:

savscan /usr/mydirectory/myfile

You can type more than one directory or file in the same command.

Scan inside all archive types

You can configure Sophos Anti-Virus to scan inside all archive types.

  • To see a list of these archive types, type:

savscan -vv.

Note: The threat detection engine only scans archived files that are up to 8GB (when decompressed).

This is because it supports the POSIX ustar archive format, which does not accommodate larger files.

  • To scan inside all archive types, use the option -archive. Type:

savscan path -archive

Archives that are “nested” within other archives (for example, a TAR archive within a ZIP archive) are scanned recursively. If you have numerous complex archives, the scan may take longer to run. Bear this in mind when scheduling unattended scans.

Scan inside a particular archive type

  • To scan inside a particular archive type, use the option that is shown in the list. For example, to scan inside TAR and ZIP archives, type:

savscan path -tar -zip

Archives that are “nested” within other archives (for example, a TAR archive within a ZIP archive) are scanned recursively. If you have numerous complex archives, the scan may take longer to run. Bear this in mind when scheduling unattended scans.

Scan remote computers

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus does not scan items on remote computers (that is, does not traverse remote mount points).

  • To scan remote computers, use the option –no-stay-on-machine. Type:

savscan path --no-stay-on-machine

Turn off scanning of symbolically linked items

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus scans symbolically linked items.

  • To turn off scanning of symbolically linked items, use the option –no-follow-symlinks. Type:

savscan path --no-follow-symlinks

To avoid scanning items more than once, use the option –backtrack-protection.

Scan the starting filesystem only

Sophos Anti-Virus can be configured not to scan items that are beyond the starting filesystem (that is, not to traverse mount points).

  • To scan the starting filesystem only, use the option –stay-on-filesystem. Type:

savscan path --stay-on-filesystem

Excluding items from scanning

  • You can configure Sophos Anti-Virus to exclude particular items (files, directories, or filesystems) from scanning by using the option -exclude. Sophos Anti-Virus excludes any items that follow the option in the command string. For example, to scan items fred and harry, but not tom or peter, type:

savscan fred harry -exclude tom peter

  • You can exclude directories or files that are under a particular directory. For example, to scan all of Fred’s home directory, but exclude the directory games (and all directories and files under it), type:

savscan /home/fred -exclude /home/fred/games

  • You can also configure Sophos Anti-Virus to include particular items that follow the option -include. For example, to scan items fred, harry, and bill, but not tom or peter, type:

savscan fred harry -exclude tom peter -include bill

Scan file types that UNIX defines as executables

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus does not scan file types that UNIX defines as executables.

  • To scan file types that UNIX defines as executables, use the option –examine-x-bit. Type:

savscan path --examine-x-bit

Sophos Anti-Virus still scans files that have filename extensions that are in its own list as well. To see a list of these filename extensions, type savscan -vv.

If you’ve spotted an error or would like to provide feedback on this article, please use the section below to rate and comment on the article.

This is invaluable to us to ensure that we continually strive to give our customers the best information possible.

Related:

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Sophos Anti-Virus for UNIX: Running and Configuring on-demand scans

Overview

This article describes the steps to configure on-demand scans on Sophos anti-virus for UNIX. An on-demand scan is a scan that you initiate. You can scan anything from a single file to everything on your computer that you have permission to read. You can either manually run an on-demand scan or schedule it to run unattended.

The command that you type to run an on-demand scan is savscan.

The following sections are covered:

Applies to the following Sophos products and versions

Sophos Anti-Virus for Unix

Run an on-demand scan of the computer

  • To run an on-demand scan of the computer, type:

savscan /

Scan a particular directory or file

  • To scan a particular directory or file, specify the path of the item. For example, type:

savscan /usr/mydirectory/myfile

You can type more than one directory or file in the same command.

Scan a filesystem

  • To scan a filesystem, specify its name. For example, type:

savscan /home

You can type more than one filesystem in the same command.

In this section, where path appears in a command, it refers to the path to be scanned.

  • To see a full list of the options that you can use with an on-demand scan, type:

man savscan

Scan all file types

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus scans only executables. To see a full list of the file types that Sophos

Anti-Virus scans by default, type savscan -vv.

  • To scan all file types, not just those that are scanned by default, use the option -all. Type:

savscan path -all

Note:This makes scanning take longer, can compromise performance on servers, and can cause

false virus reports

Scan a particular directory or file

  • To scan a particular directory or file, specify the path of the item. For example, type:

savscan /usr/mydirectory/myfile

You can type more than one directory or file in the same command.

Scan inside all archive types

You can configure Sophos Anti-Virus to scan inside all archive types.

  • To see a list of these archive types, type:

savscan -vv.

Note: The threat detection engine only scans archived files that are up to 8GB (when decompressed).

This is because it supports the POSIX ustar archive format, which does not accommodate larger files.

  • To scan inside all archive types, use the option -archive. Type:

savscan path -archive

Archives that are “nested” within other archives (for example, a TAR archive within a ZIP archive) are scanned recursively. If you have numerous complex archives, the scan may take longer to run. Bear this in mind when scheduling unattended scans.

Scan inside a particular archive type

  • To scan inside a particular archive type, use the option that is shown in the list. For example, to scan inside TAR and ZIP archives, type:

savscan path -tar -zip

Archives that are “nested” within other archives (for example, a TAR archive within a ZIP archive) are scanned recursively. If you have numerous complex archives, the scan may take longer to run. Bear this in mind when scheduling unattended scans.

Scan remote computers

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus does not scan items on remote computers (that is, does not traverse remote mount points).

  • To scan remote computers, use the option –no-stay-on-machine. Type:

savscan path --no-stay-on-machine

Turn off scanning of symbolically linked items

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus scans symbolically linked items.

  • To turn off scanning of symbolically linked items, use the option –no-follow-symlinks. Type:

savscan path --no-follow-symlinks

To avoid scanning items more than once, use the option –backtrack-protection.

Scan the starting filesystem only

Sophos Anti-Virus can be configured not to scan items that are beyond the starting filesystem (that is, not to traverse mount points).

  • To scan the starting filesystem only, use the option –stay-on-filesystem. Type:

savscan path --stay-on-filesystem

Excluding items from scanning

  • You can configure Sophos Anti-Virus to exclude particular items (files, directories, or filesystems) from scanning by using the option -exclude. Sophos Anti-Virus excludes any items that follow the option in the command string. For example, to scan items fred and harry, but not tom or peter, type:

savscan fred harry -exclude tom peter

  • You can exclude directories or files that are under a particular directory. For example, to scan all of Fred’s home directory, but exclude the directory games (and all directories and files under it), type:

savscan /home/fred -exclude /home/fred/games

  • You can also configure Sophos Anti-Virus to include particular items that follow the option -include. For example, to scan items fred, harry, and bill, but not tom or peter, type:

savscan fred harry -exclude tom peter -include bill

Scan file types that UNIX defines as executables

By default, Sophos Anti-Virus does not scan file types that UNIX defines as executables.

  • To scan file types that UNIX defines as executables, use the option –examine-x-bit. Type:

savscan path --examine-x-bit

Sophos Anti-Virus still scans files that have filename extensions that are in its own list as well. To see a list of these filename extensions, type savscan -vv.

If you’ve spotted an error or would like to provide feedback on this article, please use the section below to rate and comment on the article.

This is invaluable to us to ensure that we continually strive to give our customers the best information possible.

Related:

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7021411: Supported Legacy Reflection, Extra!, and KEA! Files in Reflection Desktop

Enabling Support for Legacy Files

In the Reflection Desktop installers, all legacy Reflection, Extra!, and Rumba compatibility features are enabled by default.

Figure 1: Reflection Desktop feature selection.

Supported Reflection Legacy Files

The following Reflection legacy files are supported:

File extension
Description
.r2w
Reflection for UNIX and OpenVMS Settings File
.r3w
Reflection for Secure IT Settings File
.r4w
Reflection for REGIS Graphics Settings File
.rsf
Reflection for IBM Settings
.rvx
VBA Macro File
.rfw
FTP Settings File
.mto
Mainframe Transfer Request File
.xto
AS/400 Transfer Request File
.rcl
Reflection Command Language Scripting File
.rbs
Reflection Basic Scripting Files
.rma
Reflection Macro File

Supported Extra! Legacy Files

File extension
Description
.eqp
Extra! QuickPads
.etb
Extra! Toolbars (read only)
.edp
Extra! Display Session
.ekm
Extra! Keyboard Map

(.ekm files can now be browsed for in the keyboard map file picker)

.eil
Extra! File Transfer Schemes
.elf
Extra! Layout Files *
.ebm
Extra! Basic Macros
.ebh
Extra! Basic Header
.etl
Extra! 3270 & 5250 File Transfer List (beginning in version 2011 R2)
.ftb
Extra! 5250 File Transfer Scheme (beginning in version 16.0)

*Extra! layout files are one type of Extra! macro. To run Extra! layout files in Reflection, you must create a file association with the .elf file extension. Follow these steps:

  1. Copy your .edp and .elf files to DocumentsMicro FocusReflection.
  2. Double-click an .elf file in the DocumentsMicro FocusReflection folder.
  3. Windows will prompt you for a file association.
    1. Browse to the Reflection install directory and select ebrun.exe.
    2. Select the check box to always use this program to open this type of file.

Supported KEA! Legacy Files

The following KEA! file type is supported.

File extension
Description
.ktc
KEA! configuration file

Supported Third Party Macro/Script Files

You can run a majority of macros created by the following products. The macros run directly without conversion.

File extension
Description
.ebs
OpenText/Hummingbird HostExplorer – Hummingbird Basic macro
.jgs
Brandon Systems/Jolly Giant QWS 3270 macro
.rmc
Micro Focus Rumba macro
.mac
IBM Personal Communications macro
.vbs
IBM Personal Communications VBScript

For more information about running macros, see https://www.attachmate.com/documentation/reflection-desktop-v16/rdesktop-guide/data/macro_legacy_ov.htm.

All trademarks, trade names, and company names referenced herein are used for identification only and are the property of their respective owners.

Troubleshooting Legacy Files

If you have problems with your legacy files, review the following issues.

Trusted Location

If your Extra! .edp files are stored in Program FilesAttachmateEXTRA! (and not in My Documents), and you open the .edp files in Reflection , then an error displays: “Unable to open because it is not in a trusted location.” To resolve this error, add the .edp file location (path) to Reflection’s Trusted Locations (specified in Reflection Workspace Settings).

Custom Configuration File Location

If you open an .edp file that refers to other custom configuration files (for example, a custom keyboard map file), the custom configuration file must be in either:

  • The “schemes” subfolder in the “Default legacy EXTRA! directory” (configured in Reflection Workspace Settings), typically My DocumentsAttachmateEXTRA!schemes, OR
  • The same location as the .edp file

If no custom configuration file is found, Reflection will use a default file, and you may think that the Extra! custom configuration settings have been lost.

In Reflection Desktop, when an .edp session file is opened and a custom keyboard map is found, a new .xkb file is created. To determine if Reflection Desktop found the custom keyboard map, open the Manage Keyboard Maps dialog and look at the filename being used (.ekm or .xkb). If Reflection cannot find the keyboard map file, defaults are used.

Related:

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SmartPools: Path-based Policies

Received the following question from the field recently:



I have a cluster with a performance H500 tier and archive A200 tier. There is a nightly job that moves inactive files from the performance storage to the archive tier. Can I set it up so that when I copy files to a folder they go directly to the A200 without waiting for the nightly job to run?

The answer to the above is yes, with a couple of caveats.

If a filepool policy applies to a directory, any new files written to it will automatically inherit the settings from the parent directory. Typically, there is not much variance between the directory and the new file. So, assuming the settings are correct, the file is written straight to the desired pool or tier, with the appropriate protection, etc. This applies to access protocols like NFS and SMB, as well as copy commands like ‘cp’ issued directly from the OneFS command line interface (CLI). However, if the file settings differ from the parent directory, the SmartPools job will correct them and restripe the file. This will happen when the job next runs, rather than at the time of file creation.

However, simply moving a file into the directory (via the UNIX CLI commands such as cp, mv, etc) will not occur until a SmartPools, SetProtectPlus, Multiscan, or Autobalance job runs to completion. Since these jobs can each perform a re-layout of data, this is when the files will be re-assigned to the desired NL pool. The file movement can be verified by running the following command from the OneFS CLI:

# isi get -dD <dir>



So the key is whether you’re doing a copy (that is, a new write) or not. As long as you’re doing writes and the parent directory of the destination has the appropriate file pool policy applied, you should get the behavior you want.

One thing to note: If the actual operation that is desired is really a move rather than a copy, it may be faster to change the file pool policy and then do a recursive “isi filepool apply –recurse” on the affected files.

There’s negligible difference between using an NFS or SMB client versus performing the copy on-cluster via the OneFS CLI. As mentioned above, using isi filepool apply will be slightly quicker than a straight copy and delete, since the copy is parallelized above the filesystem layer.

First. let’s take a quick file pools refresher…

The file pool policy engine is the logic layer of SmartPools.It’s where user configurable policies govern where data is placed, protected, accessed, and how it moves among the specified node pools and tiers. This is conceptually similar to storage ILM (information lifecycle management). However, in the case of SmartPools,this does not involve file stubbing or other file system modifications or indirection.



filepool_1.png

File pool policies allow data to be automatically moved from one type of storage to another within a single cluster to meet performance, space, cost or other requirements while retaining its data protection settings.

For example, a file pool policy may be crafted which dictates that anything written to path /ifs/path1 is automatically moved directly to the Archive tier. This can easily be configured from the OneFS WebUI by navigating to File System > Storage Pools > File Pool Policies:



path-based_placement_1.png

To simplify management, there are defaults in place for Node Pool and File Pool settings which handle basic data placement, movement, protection and performance. All of these can also be configured via the simple and intuitive UI, delivering deep granularity of control. Also provided are customizable template policies which are optimized for archiving, extra protection, performance and VMware files.

When a SmartPools job runs, the data may be moved, undergo a protection or layout change, etc. There are no stubs. The file system itself is doing the work so no transparency or data access risks apply.

Data movement is parallelized with the resources of multiple nodes being leveraged for speedy job completion. While a job is in progress all data is completely available to users and applications.

The performance of different nodes can also be augmented with the addition of system cache or Solid State Drives (SSDs). Within a File Pool, SSD ‘Strategies’ can be configured to place a copy of that pool’s metadata, or even some of its data, on SSDs in that pool.

Overall system performance impact can be configured to suit the peaks and lulls of an environment’s workload. Change the time or frequency of any SmartPools job and the amount of resources allocated to SmartPools. For extremely high-utilization environments, a sample File Pool policy can be used to match SmartPools run times to non-peak computing hours. While resources required to execute SmartPools jobs are low and the defaults work for the vast majority of environments, that extra control can be beneficial when system resources are heavily utilized.

SmartPools file pool policies can be used to broadly control the three principal attributes of a file:

File Attribute

Option

Where a file resides

  • Tier
  • Node Pool
Performance profile (I/O optimization setting
  • Sequential
  • Concurrent
  • Random
  • SmartCache write caching coalescer
Protection level
  • Parity protected: +1n to +4n, +2d:1n, etc.
  • Mirrored: 2x to 8x
SSD Strategy
  • Metadata-read
  • Metadata-write
  • Data
  • Avoid



Note: In addition to the attributes above, file pool policies can also be created to configure CloudPools archiving, snapshot location, etc.

So, a file pool policy is built on a file attribute the policy can match on. The attributes include:

File Attribute

Description

File Name

Specifies file criteria based on the file name

Path

Specifies file criteria based on where the file is stored

File Type

Specifies file criteria based on the file-system object type

File Size

Specifies file criteria based on the file size

Modified Time

Specifies file criteria based on when the file was last modified

Create Time

Specifies file criteria based on when the file was created

Metadata Change Time

Specifies file criteria based on when the file metadata was last modified

Access Time

Specifies file criteria based on when the file was last accessed

User Attributes

Specifies file criteria based on custom attributes – see below

Once the file attribute is set to select the appropriate files, the action to be taken on those files can be added. For example: if the attribute is File Size, additional settings are available to dictate thresholds (all files bigger than… smaller than…). Next, actions are applied: move to Node Pool x, set to y protection level and lay out for z access setting.

‘And’ and ‘Or’ operators allow for the combination of criteria within a single policyfor flexible, granular data manipulation.

As noted above, for file Pool Policies that dictate placement of data based on its path, data typically lands on the correct node pool or tier without a SmartPools job running. File Pool Policies that dictate placement of data on other attributes besides path name get written to Disk Pool with the highest available capacity and then moved, if necessary to match a File Pool policy, when the next SmartPools job runs. This ensures that write performance is not sacrificed for initial data placement.

Any data not covered by a File Pool policy is moved to a tier that can be selected as a default for exactly this purpose. If no Disk Pool has been selected for this purpose, SmartPools will default to the Node Pool with the most available capacity.



Be aware that, when re-configuring an existing path-based file pool policy to target a different node pool or tier, the change will not immediately take effect for the new incoming data. The directory where new files will be created must be updated first and there are a several options available to address this:



  • Running the SmartPools job will achieve this. However, this can take a significant amount of time, as the job may entail restriping or migrating a large quantity of file data.

  • Invoking the ’isi filepool apply <path>’ command on a single directory in question will do it very rapidly. This option is ideal for a single, or small number, of ‘incoming’ data directories.

  • To update all directories in a given sub-tree, but not affect the files’ actual data layouts, use:

# isi filepool apply –dont-restripe –recurse /ifs/path1

  • OneFS 8.0 and later releases contain the SmartPoolsTree job engine job specifically for this purpose. This can be invoked as follows:

# isi job start SmartPoolsTree –directory-only –path /ifs/path1

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7022884: Determine host settings converted when migrating legacy Host session Files to Reflection Desktop 16

Reflection will automatically migrate legacy Host session files and a conversion report can be generated which shows the settings that have or have not been converted. If the legacy display session setting does not have an equivalent in Reflection, it is not converted.

To convert legacy IBM display session files in Reflection, follow these steps:

1. Locate and launch the display session file in Reflection.

2. Examine the connection and terminal properties, the converted settings, in Reflection.

3. Save the settings in Reflection in the new session file format.

When closing the Host session in Reflection a prompt will apeear that says “Do you want to save changes to <sessionName>.

Answer Yes and enter the appropriate new file name with extension *.RD3X or *.RD5X .

Follow the steps below to create a conversion report:

1. Start Reflection from the command line using the –legacyreport option.

For example:

“C:Program Files (x86)Micro FocusReflectionAttachmate.Emulation.Frame.exe” -f “<sessionName>” –legacyreport

The other option is to open the Attachmate.Emulation.Frame.exe with the -legacyreport command line option

and then each time a legacy Host session file is opened from the Reflection Workspace via the File / Open menu

the conversion report will be generated.

2. Open the conversion report file, located in the My Documents folder on the workstation, and examine the converted session settings.

See Additional Information for the conversion report file name, which is different for each product session file converted.

The report is in a comma-delimited format, so is best viewed in a spreadsheet program, such as Microsoft Excel.

Each time a session file is converted the new output file will overwrite the existing file. Thus to retain the conversion information for each session, rename the output report file in the My Documents folder between each conversion.

Related:

7021495: Supported Legacy Reflection, EXTRA!, and KEA! Files in Reflection 2014 and 2011

Enabling Support for Legacy Files

Enabling support for legacy files depends on your product and previous installations.

Reflection 2014

All legacy Reflection and EXTRA! compatibility features are enabled by default in Reflection 2014.

Support for using legacy KEA! files is available starting with Reflection 2014. This feature is available on the Attachmate installation program “Feature Selection” tab, under UNIX and OpenVMS > Compatibility.

Figure 1: Reflection 2014 feature selection.

Reflection 2011

Legacy Reflection Compatibility features are enabled by default in Reflection 2011.

If you are installing Reflection 2011 on a machine that has EXTRA! or was previously upgraded from EXTRA! to Reflection, the Legacy EXTRA! Compatibility features are enabled by default.

If you are installing Reflection 2011 on a machine that does not have EXTRA! and you want to use EXTRA! files, you must select “Legacy EXTRA!” when you install Reflection. This feature is available on the Attachmate installation program “Feature Selection” tab, under 3270/5250 > Compatibility or UNIX and OpenVMS > Compatibility.

View Full Size

Figure 2: Reflection 2011 feature selection.
Figure 2: Reflection 2011 feature selection.

Supported Reflection Legacy Files

The following Reflection legacy files are supported:



Reflection 2014
Reflection 2011
.r2w
Reflection for UNIX and OpenVMS Settings File
yes
yes
.r3w
Reflection for Secure IT Settings File
yes
yes (R3)
.r4w
Reflection for REGIS Graphics Settings File
yes
yes
.rsf
Reflection for IBM Settings
yes
yes
.rvx
VBA Macro File
yes
yes
.rfw
FTP Settings File
yes
yes
.mto
Mainframe Transfer Request File
yes
yes
.xto
AS/400 Transfer Request File
yes
yes
.rcl
Reflection Command Language Scripting File
yes
yes
.rbs
Reflection Basic Scripting Files
yes
yes
.rma
Reflection Macro File
yes
yes

Supported EXTRA! Legacy Files



Reflection 2014
Reflection 2011
.eqp
EXTRA! QuickPads (read only)
yes
yes
.etb
EXTRA! Toolbars (read only)
yes
yes
.edp
Display Session
yes
yes
.ekm
EXTRA! Keyboard Map
yes (.ekm files can now be browsed for in the keyboard map file picker)
yes
.eil
EXTRA! File Transfer Schemes
yes
yes

(R1 SP1)

.elf
EXTRA! Layout Files *
yes
yes
.ebm
EXTRA! Basic Macros
yes
yes
.ebh
EXTRA! Basic Header
yes
yes

* EXTRA! layout files are one type of EXTRA! macro. To run EXTRA! layout files in Reflection you must create a file association with the .elf file extension. Follow these steps:

  1. Copy your .edp and .elf files to DocumentsAttachmateReflection.
  2. Double-click an .elf file in the DocumentsAttachmateReflection folder.
  3. Windows will prompt you for a file association.
    1. Browse to the Reflection install directory and select ebrun.exe.
    2. Select the check box to always use this program to open this type of file.

Supported KEA! Legacy Files

The following KEA! file type is supported.



Reflection 2014
Reflection 2011
.ktc
KEA! configuration file
yes
no

Supported Third Party Product Files

You can run a majority of macros created by the following products. The macros run directly without conversion.



Reflection 2014
Reflection 2011
.ebs
OpenText/Hummingbird HostExplorer – Hummingbird Basic macro
yes
yes (R3)
.jgs
Brandon Systems/Jolly Giant QWS 3270 macro
yes
yes (R3)
.rmc
Micro Focus Rumba macro
yes
yes
.mac
IBM Personal Communications macro
yes
yes
.vbs
IBM Personal Communications VBScript
yes
no

For more information about running macros, see http://docs.attachmate.com/reflection/2014/r1/tshelp/en/user-html/macros_run_pr.htm.

All trademarks, trade names, and company names referenced herein are used for identification only and are the property of their respective owners.

Troubleshooting Legacy Files

If you have problems with your legacy files, review the following issues.

Trusted Location

If your EXTRA! .edp files are stored in Program FilesAttachmateEXTRA! (and not in My Documents), and you open the .edp files in Reflection , then an error displays: “Unable to open because it is not in a trusted location.” To resolve this error, add the .edp file location (path) to Reflection’s Trusted Locations (specified in Reflection Workspace Settings).

Custom Configuration File Location

If you open an .edp file that refers to other custom configuration files (for example, a custom keyboard map file), the custom configuration file must be in either:

  • The “schemes” subfolder in the “Default legacy EXTRA! directory” (configured in Reflection Workspace Settings), typically My DocumentsAttachmateEXTRA!schemes, OR
  • The same location as the .edp file

If no custom configuration file is found, Reflection will use a default file, and you may think that the EXTRA! custom configuration settings have been lost.

In Reflection 2014, when an .edp session file is opened and a custom keyboard map is found, a new .xkb file is created. To determine if Reflection 2014 or 2011 found the custom keyboard map, open the Manage Keyboard Maps dialog and look at the filename being used (.ekm or .xkb). If Reflection cannot find the keyboard map file, defaults are used.

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